"Chicken Stock" recipe - "Brodo di Pollo"

“Chicken Stock” recipe – “Brodo di Pollo”

    • Prep Time
    • Minutes
    • Cook Time
    • Minutes

Total Cost: UK/£ 7.68*

Cost/portion: UK/£ 1.28*

Utensils you will need


One chef knife
One paring knife
One filleting knife
One blow torch (or the gas hobs)
One kitchen towel
Two chopping boards (one for the raw meat and one for the vegetables)
One kitchen tweezers
One potato peeler
One thin mesh skimmer
One 9 to 11lt saucepan
One large plate
One bowl
One 8lt saucepan
One large splatter screen
One electric whisk or similar (or a normal hand whisk)
One large bowl
One skimmer
One thin mesh sieve
One muslin cloth (optional)

Note for the users: please click on the label “HOW TO” to watch the slide-show of each cooking step.

* Please note that both total cost and cost per portion are approximate and that can vary according to seasons and to different conditions.

Recipe Rating

  • (1 Rating)

Ingredients

  • for the stock

  • One whole chicken - about 1.0kg

  • Leek - one large stalk

  • Celery stalks - 3 with the leaves

  • Carrots - 3

  • Onions - 3

  • Parsley sprigs - 15gr

  • Shallots - 4 small

  • Bay leaves - 3

  • Black pepper corns - 4gr

  • Water - 7 to 8lt

  • Crystal salt - 16gr

  • for clarifying the stock

  • Eggs - 4 to 8

Instructions

  • 1.
    Plucking, singeing and washing the chicken

    • One whole chicken - about 1.0kg

      Check the chicken’s skin for remnants of feathers and hair along the ends of wings and legs, the tail, the neck as well as along the folding of the skin and the limbs junction.
      Pluck the bigger feathers with a fish bone tweezer accurately extracting the roots.
      Remove any offals left inside, such as the liver, kidneys and the heart. Chop off the unwanted ends like the tail and the head if still present as well as any excess of fat. Leave instead the ankles attached to the legs as they will hold the meat better together and the whole boiled chicken will look nicer when served.
      Singe the chicken skin over the flame of your gas hobs or carefully using a blow torch. The skin will tend to shrink when exposed to the heat.
      The blow torch will be much more powerful than the gas fires, so never use it vertically towards the skin, but parallel to the surface. This way the burnings will be minimum.
      Wash the chicken under running water to remove any dirt from the skin and any inner lump of blood.
      Dry thoroughly the chicken with a clean kitchen towel.
      Set aside.

  • 2.
    Peeling and washing the vegetables

    • Leek - one large stalk
    • Celery stalks - 3 with the leaves
    • Carrots - 3
    • Onions - 3
    • Parsley sprigs - 15gr
    • Shallots - 4 small

      Peel the carrots and clean both their ends. wash them under running water and set aside. Lean the leek’s roots and peel off the external layers. Then, gradually cut the green leaves starting from the central area to the top end with progressively deeper cuts. Run the paring knife’s blade from the root to the other end making a cut the reaches the central core.
      Open the leek’s layer and wash them under running water in order to remove any inner dirt. Set aside (step 2 - pic.A).
      Thoroughly wash the parsley and the celery stalks under running water and set aside. Peel the shallots and the onions and set aside (step 2 - pic.B).

  • 3.
    Putting the ingredients in the stock with cold water

    • All the peeled and washed vegetables
    • The plucked and singed chicken
    • Bay leaves - 3
    • Black pepper corns - 4gr
    • Water - 7 to 8lt

      Put the vegetables, the bay leaves and the black pepper corns on the bottom of the large saucepan. Then add the whole chicken on top (step 3 - pic.A).
      Fill the saucepan with cold water almost up to the rim (step 3 - pic.B).
      When you make stock, either with meat or with vegetables only, always start with cold water: this way all the ingredients’ essences and flavours will be transferred to the water, making your stock as much tasty as possible.
      On the opposite, if you want to boil meats and vegetables for eating them, bring the water to the boiling point, then drop in the food, which will hold inside all their flavour and properties.

  • 4.
    Cooking and skimming the stock

    • One bowl
    • One thin mesh skimmer
    • One bowl Set the heat on a medium power. The water will need from 60 to 80 minutes to start simmering gently. At this point, lower the heat and start skimming all the impurities that will come to the surface. Use a thin mesh skimmer and wash it into a bowl with clean water, so you won;t bring the dirt back to the saucepan (step 4 - pic.).
      Let the stock barely simmer like this for another hour and keep skimming the surface frequently.
      Do not cover so the stock will not get cloudy.

  • 5.
    Seasoning the stock with salt

    • Crystal salt - 16gr

      When the chicken has cooked through (it will take about 2 and half hours, depending on the size), you can add the salt. Season with 16gr of crystal salt. Gently move the water with the skimmer trying not to brake the chicken and veggies in order to keep the stock as clean as possible (step 5 - pic.).
      Let the stock cook for another hour.
      Do not salt the stock earlier: this way the meat and the vegetables will flavour the water much better.
      Adding the salt while making the stock is only needed in order to allow the meat and the vegetables to gain back some more sapidity. This way they can be used in other preparations or be part of a meal course and served, for example, with green sauce or mustard.

  • 6.
    Resting and cooling the stock

    • One large splatter screen

      If you don’t want to use the stock for clear soups (as for tortellini) you can take the pan away form the heat and let it chill slowly.
      Do not cover, but if possible, use a grid lift to keep the meat and the veggies completely submerged. Use a large splatter screen to prevent contamination by any external impurity and any inner condensation (step 6 - pic.A).

  • 7.
    Clarifying the stock

    • Eggs - 4 to 8
    • One large bowl
    • One electric whisk or similar (or a normal hand whisk)
    • One skimmer
    • One muslin cloth (optional)

      Clarification is a process of purification of any broth. It is done for presentation porpouses. It can be done either using mince meats and diced vegetables or, more simply and cheaply, with beaten egg whites as in this case.
      The process can be repeated two or three times in order to achieve a perfect transparency of the stock.
      First, remove all the boiled meat and the vegetables and set them aside (step 7 - pic.A).
      Pass all the stock through a thin mesh sieve into another large saucepan or bowl in order to remove the bigger bits and the pepper cloves (if you use a bowl, thoroughly wash the saucepan before putting the stock back in) (step 7 - pic.B).
      Put the saucepan on a high heat and let the stock come to the boil.
      Brake 4 eggs and separate the yolks and the whites. Then whisk the egg whites to stiff peaks (if you have an electric whisk, the job will be much easier) (step 7 - pic.C).
      As soon as the stock starts boiling, take it away from the heat, and immediately drop in all the egg whites in one go (step 7 - pic.D).
      With a skimmer, start stirring the egg whites and the stock together, trying to sink and mix them to the hot stock.
      By doing so, any small impurity will get trapped into the egg whites’ net, leaving the stock progressively clearer and cleaner.
      The egg whites will gradually cook and shrink, so you will need to take them out with a skimmer (step 7 - pic.E).
      If the stock looks still cloudy or if dirt is still present, repeat the process again with another 4 eggs.
      Place the thin mesh sieve on a clean saucepan again and place on top of it one or two wet muslin cloths.
      Then, gradually pass the stock through the muslin cloth in order to remove any remnants of egg whites (step 7 - pic.F).
      Let the stock shill completely or heat it again and serve it.

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Instructions

  • 1.
    Plucking, singeing and washing the chicken

    • One whole chicken - about 1.0kg

      Check the chicken’s skin for remnants of feathers and hair along the ends of wings and legs, the tail, the neck as well as along the folding of the skin and the limbs junction.
      Pluck the bigger feathers with a fish bone tweezer accurately extracting the roots.
      Remove any offals left inside, such as the liver, kidneys and the heart. Chop off the unwanted ends like the tail and the head if still present as well as any excess of fat. Leave instead the ankles attached to the legs as they will hold the meat better together and the whole boiled chicken will look nicer when served.
      Singe the chicken skin over the flame of your gas hobs or carefully using a blow torch. The skin will tend to shrink when exposed to the heat.
      The blow torch will be much more powerful than the gas fires, so never use it vertically towards the skin, but parallel to the surface. This way the burnings will be minimum.
      Wash the chicken under running water to remove any dirt from the skin and any inner lump of blood.
      Dry thoroughly the chicken with a clean kitchen towel.
      Set aside.

  • 2.
    Peeling and washing the vegetables

    • Leek - one large stalk
    • Celery stalks - 3 with the leaves
    • Carrots - 3
    • Onions - 3
    • Parsley sprigs - 15gr
    • Shallots - 4 small

      Peel the carrots and clean both their ends. wash them under running water and set aside. Lean the leek’s roots and peel off the external layers. Then, gradually cut the green leaves starting from the central area to the top end with progressively deeper cuts. Run the paring knife’s blade from the root to the other end making a cut the reaches the central core.
      Open the leek’s layer and wash them under running water in order to remove any inner dirt. Set aside (step 2 - pic.A).
      Thoroughly wash the parsley and the celery stalks under running water and set aside. Peel the shallots and the onions and set aside (step 2 - pic.B).

  • 3.
    Putting the ingredients in the stock with cold water

    • All the peeled and washed vegetables
    • The plucked and singed chicken
    • Bay leaves - 3
    • Black pepper corns - 4gr
    • Water - 7 to 8lt

      Put the vegetables, the bay leaves and the black pepper corns on the bottom of the large saucepan. Then add the whole chicken on top (step 3 - pic.A).
      Fill the saucepan with cold water almost up to the rim (step 3 - pic.B).
      When you make stock, either with meat or with vegetables only, always start with cold water: this way all the ingredients’ essences and flavours will be transferred to the water, making your stock as much tasty as possible.
      On the opposite, if you want to boil meats and vegetables for eating them, bring the water to the boiling point, then drop in the food, which will hold inside all their flavour and properties.

  • 4.
    Cooking and skimming the stock

    • One bowl
    • One thin mesh skimmer
    • One bowl Set the heat on a medium power. The water will need from 60 to 80 minutes to start simmering gently. At this point, lower the heat and start skimming all the impurities that will come to the surface. Use a thin mesh skimmer and wash it into a bowl with clean water, so you won;t bring the dirt back to the saucepan (step 4 - pic.).
      Let the stock barely simmer like this for another hour and keep skimming the surface frequently.
      Do not cover so the stock will not get cloudy.

  • 5.
    Seasoning the stock with salt

    • Crystal salt - 16gr

      When the chicken has cooked through (it will take about 2 and half hours, depending on the size), you can add the salt. Season with 16gr of crystal salt. Gently move the water with the skimmer trying not to brake the chicken and veggies in order to keep the stock as clean as possible (step 5 - pic.).
      Let the stock cook for another hour.
      Do not salt the stock earlier: this way the meat and the vegetables will flavour the water much better.
      Adding the salt while making the stock is only needed in order to allow the meat and the vegetables to gain back some more sapidity. This way they can be used in other preparations or be part of a meal course and served, for example, with green sauce or mustard.

  • 6.
    Resting and cooling the stock

    • One large splatter screen

      If you don’t want to use the stock for clear soups (as for tortellini) you can take the pan away form the heat and let it chill slowly.
      Do not cover, but if possible, use a grid lift to keep the meat and the veggies completely submerged. Use a large splatter screen to prevent contamination by any external impurity and any inner condensation (step 6 - pic.A).

  • 7.
    Clarifying the stock

    • Eggs - 4 to 8
    • One large bowl
    • One electric whisk or similar (or a normal hand whisk)
    • One skimmer
    • One muslin cloth (optional)

      Clarification is a process of purification of any broth. It is done for presentation porpouses. It can be done either using mince meats and diced vegetables or, more simply and cheaply, with beaten egg whites as in this case.
      The process can be repeated two or three times in order to achieve a perfect transparency of the stock.
      First, remove all the boiled meat and the vegetables and set them aside (step 7 - pic.A).
      Pass all the stock through a thin mesh sieve into another large saucepan or bowl in order to remove the bigger bits and the pepper cloves (if you use a bowl, thoroughly wash the saucepan before putting the stock back in) (step 7 - pic.B).
      Put the saucepan on a high heat and let the stock come to the boil.
      Brake 4 eggs and separate the yolks and the whites. Then whisk the egg whites to stiff peaks (if you have an electric whisk, the job will be much easier) (step 7 - pic.C).
      As soon as the stock starts boiling, take it away from the heat, and immediately drop in all the egg whites in one go (step 7 - pic.D).
      With a skimmer, start stirring the egg whites and the stock together, trying to sink and mix them to the hot stock.
      By doing so, any small impurity will get trapped into the egg whites’ net, leaving the stock progressively clearer and cleaner.
      The egg whites will gradually cook and shrink, so you will need to take them out with a skimmer (step 7 - pic.E).
      If the stock looks still cloudy or if dirt is still present, repeat the process again with another 4 eggs.
      Place the thin mesh sieve on a clean saucepan again and place on top of it one or two wet muslin cloths.
      Then, gradually pass the stock through the muslin cloth in order to remove any remnants of egg whites (step 7 - pic.F).
      Let the stock shill completely or heat it again and serve it.

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"Chicken Stock" recipe - "Brodo di Pollo"
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