Homemade fresh pasta

Homemade Italian fresh pasta: the “sfoglia”
La sfoglia: pasta all’uovo fatta in casa

    • Prep Time
    • Minutes

Homemade fresh pasta - the ingredients

Total Cost: UK/£ 1,72*

Cost/portion: UK/£ 0,34*

How to make your own Italian fresh pasta

Master this one and you master them all!

Here it is, another “must” of Italian cooking: homemade fresh pasta. Tagliatelle, fettuccine, pappardelle, tagliolini, spaghetti… they are all made this way. Master this one and you master them all.

0UK – 1UK: high quality ingredients

The ingredients are extremely simple: flour and eggs. As I always say, the simpler the ingredients, the higher their quality must be. Spare money on the eggs and your pasta will be tasteless,no matter what its sauce might be. So buy free range eggs or organic eggs: they cost more because the hens have been living in a respectful way, not inside a shoes box, and have been fed properly. All eggs must have a code printed on them that routes back directly to the farmer. Organic eggs have their code starting with “0UK” (zero-uk). Free range eggs’ code starts with “1UK”. I do not recommend to use number 2 or 3… seriously!

Obviously, the fresher the better! Fresh eggs have a mush more gelatinous albumen which will give a higher elasticity to the dough.

Soft wheat weak flour

Also not all soft wheat flours are the same: there are weak flours and strong flours. Strong flours are good for bread making, the weak fours instead are good for pastry dough, cakes and thickening. You can check their “strength” by reading the labels, which should record the percentage of proteins in the flour. Strong flours have a protein percentage that goes from 12% to 15%. Weak flours’ percentage roughly goes from 9,2% to 10,2%. In between them there are the medium strength flours.

For making pasta you need weak flours. And according to their “strength”, the percentage of eggs can go from the 60%  to the 70% every 100gr of flour: the stronger the flour is, the more “liquids” you need to add.

Are u good at maths?

If u are into mathematics, you can calculate the amount of flour by multiplying the grams of eggs by 1,666 (or 1,428 to make it more elastic), and calculate the eggs by multiplying the flour by 0,6 or 0,7. If you are not into maths at all… consider one large egg every 100gr.

Since the weight of eggs can vary, I suggest weighing the eggs first and then measuring the flour, so you will always get the same result.

 

Related post:

Homemade pappardelle with mushrooms sauce – Pappardelle ai funghi

 

 Note for the users: please click on the label “HOW TO” to watch the slide-show of each cooking step.

* Please note that both total cost and cost per portion are approximate and that can vary according to seasons and to different conditions.

Recipe Rating

  • (1 Rating)

Ingredients

  • Eggs - 180gr

  • Plain weak four - 300gr (protein percentage from 9,3% to 10,2%)

  • Back-up flour - 2tbs

  • Flour - as needed

  • Utensils

  • One long rolling pin

  • Olive oil - 1tbs

  • Kitchen paper

  • One scale

  • One large kneading board

  • Two small bowls

  • One fork

  • Cling film

  • One scraper

  • One table cloth

  • One sharp square blade knife of chef knife

  • Optional utensils

  • One pasta machine

Instructions

  • 1.
    Measuring and preparing the ingredients

    • Eggs - 180gr
    • Plain weak four - 300gr
    • One scale
    • One large kneading board
    • One long rolling pin
    • Two small bowls
    • One fork

      Break the eggs into a small bowl and weigh them.
      According to the flour’s strength and the kind of sfoglia you want to make, the ratio should be 60gr-70gr of eggs every 100gr of flour.
      Generally, sfoglia for making tagliatelle, pappardelle, fettuccine and all sorts of long and short pasta need less eggs. For filled pasta like ravioli or tortellini or ballanzoni, a more elastic sfoglia will be better.
      Since the weight of eggs can vary, I suggest weighing the eggs first and then measuring the flour (step 1 - pic. A-B), so you will always get the same result.
      If u are into mathematics, you can calculate the amount of flour by multiplying the grams of eggs by 1,666 (or 1,428 to make it more elastic), and calculate the eggs by multiplying the flour by 0,6 or 0,7. If you are not into maths at all... consider a large egg every 100gr.
      Whisk the eggs with a fork trying to not incorporate any air. Sieve the flour directly onto the kneading board to prevent any lumps. Then, keep aside almost a quarter of it to be added later gradually (step 1 - pic. C).

  • 2.
    Making the flour well and mixing the eggs

    • The sieved flour on the board
    • The egg mixture
    • One fork

      Make a large well with the flour leaving the centre clear of any flour, then add the egg mixture all together (step 2 - pic. A).
      Using the fork, scrape the flour from the inner edge and mix it gradually with the eggs making a smooth mixture (step 2 - pic. B).

  • 3.
    Mixing the dough

    • One scraper
    • The left over quarter of flour

      When the egg mixture has become steady and it doesn’t spread all over the board, incorporate the flour from the edges smearing the loose dough with a scraper (step 3 - pic. A).
      Then, start adding the flour from the quarter you left aside. Doing so, the dough will get gradually dryer and crumbly (step 3 - pic. B).

  • 4.
    Kneading, folding and resting the dough

    • The dough
    • Cling film
    • Back-up flour - 2tbs

      Make a rough ball with the dough, then using one hand only, compress the dough with your wrist sliding it toward the outer end (step 4 - pic. A). With your fingers, collect the end and roll it back overlapping the edges. Repeat this a couple of times. Then rotate the dough 90 degrees, so the seal will be vertical to you, and start over kneading as you did before. Repeat this again until the dough gets perfectly smooth and doesn’t stick to the kneading board anymore (step 4 - pic. B).
      You might need to dust the kneading board with some back-up flour to help you work the dough, but do not overflour, or the dough will become too dry and you won’t be able to roll it out properly.
      Wrap the dough tightly with cling film and put it in the fridge: it will need to rest at least 10 minutes (step 4 - pic. C). I suggest resting it for 30 minutes. Do not let it rest for more than one hour or it will loose elasticity.

  • 5.
    Cleaning the kneading board and oiling the rolling pin

    • One scraper
    • One long rolling pin
    • Olive oil - 1tbs
    • Kitchen paper

      While the dough is resting, clean the kneading board using the scraper and remove any remnants of dry dough. These might Break the sfoglia sheet while you are rolling it out. Do not use a wet cloth which would damp the wood fibers making the rolling out almost impossible and also cause hygiene problems.
      Spread 1tbs of olive oil on a kitchen paper sheet and oil the rolling pin. This will moist the wood making it “tender” against the dough wich won’t stick to the rolling pin, and it’s surface won’t wrinkle.

  • 6.
    Rolling out the dough: making the “sfoglia”

    • The rested dough
    • Flour - as needed
    • The kneading board
    • The rolling pin

      Lightly dust the kneading board with some flour, then place the dough on the kneading board and roughly round its shape pressing it longwise with the rolling pin. Do not work it and fold it with your hand otherwise the gluten will become active again, shrinking the dough at every passage of the rolling pin. Also, dust with flour only if strictly necessary otherwise it will harden and dry out the dough’s surface.
      Start moving the rolling pin from the centre outwards (step 6 - pic. A). Do not run it from one edge to the other because this would drive the dough back to the centre. Then rotate the dough 90º while driving the rolling pin from the centre out (step 6 - pic. B). Keep rotating the dough at every rolling, (step 6 - pic. C). When the disc has become big enough, roll up almost the whole sheet of dough around the rolling pin, move the sheet to the board’s lower end and let it fall out from the edge. This will keep it in place while you unroll the dough and slightly stretch it to thin it out (step 6 - pic. D). Repeat this while you keep rotating the dough sheet longwise and crosswise (step 6 - pic. E). It is essential that you drive the rolling pin towards you to prevent forming any crease. Also, follow the sheet’s edge with your hands, so the pressure you put on the rolling pin will be evenly distributed along the edges also (step 6 - pic. F).
      If you have a pasta machine, roll out the dough sheet until it get 3mm thick. Then cut in into 8 to 9cm large strips. Pass each one of them twice with the machine set on nº9. Fold the strip in half matching the ends and pass it again starting from the free ends to the folded edge. Repeat twice.
      Then set the machine to nº8 and repeat the folding and pressing twice and then reducing the gap between the machine’s cylinders. The sheet will become slightly sticky and this will create a bubble of air at the centre of the folded edge which will pop when going through the cylinders. It will mean the dough has gained the right consistency and from now on, you will only need to thin out the sheet. the sheet is thin enough for tagliatelle when it’s half a millimetre to one millimetre thick.
      For pappardelle you will need to stop when it is one and a half millimetre thick.

  • 7.
    Resting the “sfoglia” folded up in a tablecloth

    • The rolled out “sfoglia”
    • One tablecloth
    • Flour - as needed

      Fold the dough sheet into a tablecloth dust it lightly with flour and let it rest for at least 10 minutes. I suggest letting it rest it for 30 minutes again (step 7 - pic. A-B).
      This will allow the sheet to dry slightly so, when you cut it, the cut edges won’t stick to each other.

  • 8.
    Cutting the rested “sfoglia” with a the knife

    • The rested “sfoglia”
    • Flour - as needed
    • One kneading board
    • One sharp square blade knife or chef knife

      Just before cooking time, put the dough sheet on the kneading board and cut it in half. Put the two halves on top of each other (step 8 - pic. A), match the edges and fold them over creating a flat roll (step 8 - pic. B). With a sharp knife, cut the roll into 1,5 to 2cm large strips to make pappardelle (step 8 - pic. C). Fettuccine are 1cm large, tagliatelle are 5 to 7mm large, tagliolini are 2 to 3 mm large.
      Unroll each pappardella on the kneading board and dust them with flour, or if you want to dry it out and make it last for one or two days, put them on a pasta dryer. You might need to cut the longest strips in half, as they should be no longer than 28-30cm to make them easy to eat.

Instructions

  • 1.
    Measuring and preparing the ingredients

    • Eggs - 180gr
    • Plain weak four - 300gr
    • One scale
    • One large kneading board
    • One long rolling pin
    • Two small bowls
    • One fork

      Break the eggs into a small bowl and weigh them.
      According to the flour’s strength and the kind of sfoglia you want to make, the ratio should be 60gr-70gr of eggs every 100gr of flour.
      Generally, sfoglia for making tagliatelle, pappardelle, fettuccine and all sorts of long and short pasta need less eggs. For filled pasta like ravioli or tortellini or ballanzoni, a more elastic sfoglia will be better.
      Since the weight of eggs can vary, I suggest weighing the eggs first and then measuring the flour (step 1 - pic. A-B), so you will always get the same result.
      If u are into mathematics, you can calculate the amount of flour by multiplying the grams of eggs by 1,666 (or 1,428 to make it more elastic), and calculate the eggs by multiplying the flour by 0,6 or 0,7. If you are not into maths at all... consider a large egg every 100gr.
      Whisk the eggs with a fork trying to not incorporate any air. Sieve the flour directly onto the kneading board to prevent any lumps. Then, keep aside almost a quarter of it to be added later gradually (step 1 - pic. C).

  • 2.
    Making the flour well and mixing the eggs

    • The sieved flour on the board
    • The egg mixture
    • One fork

      Make a large well with the flour leaving the centre clear of any flour, then add the egg mixture all together (step 2 - pic. A).
      Using the fork, scrape the flour from the inner edge and mix it gradually with the eggs making a smooth mixture (step 2 - pic. B).

  • 3.
    Mixing the dough

    • One scraper
    • The left over quarter of flour

      When the egg mixture has become steady and it doesn’t spread all over the board, incorporate the flour from the edges smearing the loose dough with a scraper (step 3 - pic. A).
      Then, start adding the flour from the quarter you left aside. Doing so, the dough will get gradually dryer and crumbly (step 3 - pic. B).

  • 4.
    Kneading, folding and resting the dough

    • The dough
    • Cling film
    • Back-up flour - 2tbs

      Make a rough ball with the dough, then using one hand only, compress the dough with your wrist sliding it toward the outer end (step 4 - pic. A). With your fingers, collect the end and roll it back overlapping the edges. Repeat this a couple of times. Then rotate the dough 90 degrees, so the seal will be vertical to you, and start over kneading as you did before. Repeat this again until the dough gets perfectly smooth and doesn’t stick to the kneading board anymore (step 4 - pic. B).
      You might need to dust the kneading board with some back-up flour to help you work the dough, but do not overflour, or the dough will become too dry and you won’t be able to roll it out properly.
      Wrap the dough tightly with cling film and put it in the fridge: it will need to rest at least 10 minutes (step 4 - pic. C). I suggest resting it for 30 minutes. Do not let it rest for more than one hour or it will loose elasticity.

  • 5.
    Cleaning the kneading board and oiling the rolling pin

    • One scraper
    • One long rolling pin
    • Olive oil - 1tbs
    • Kitchen paper

      While the dough is resting, clean the kneading board using the scraper and remove any remnants of dry dough. These might Break the sfoglia sheet while you are rolling it out. Do not use a wet cloth which would damp the wood fibers making the rolling out almost impossible and also cause hygiene problems.
      Spread 1tbs of olive oil on a kitchen paper sheet and oil the rolling pin. This will moist the wood making it “tender” against the dough wich won’t stick to the rolling pin, and it’s surface won’t wrinkle.

  • 6.
    Rolling out the dough: making the “sfoglia”

    • The rested dough
    • Flour - as needed
    • The kneading board
    • The rolling pin

      Lightly dust the kneading board with some flour, then place the dough on the kneading board and roughly round its shape pressing it longwise with the rolling pin. Do not work it and fold it with your hand otherwise the gluten will become active again, shrinking the dough at every passage of the rolling pin. Also, dust with flour only if strictly necessary otherwise it will harden and dry out the dough’s surface.
      Start moving the rolling pin from the centre outwards (step 6 - pic. A). Do not run it from one edge to the other because this would drive the dough back to the centre. Then rotate the dough 90º while driving the rolling pin from the centre out (step 6 - pic. B). Keep rotating the dough at every rolling, (step 6 - pic. C). When the disc has become big enough, roll up almost the whole sheet of dough around the rolling pin, move the sheet to the board’s lower end and let it fall out from the edge. This will keep it in place while you unroll the dough and slightly stretch it to thin it out (step 6 - pic. D). Repeat this while you keep rotating the dough sheet longwise and crosswise (step 6 - pic. E). It is essential that you drive the rolling pin towards you to prevent forming any crease. Also, follow the sheet’s edge with your hands, so the pressure you put on the rolling pin will be evenly distributed along the edges also (step 6 - pic. F).
      If you have a pasta machine, roll out the dough sheet until it get 3mm thick. Then cut in into 8 to 9cm large strips. Pass each one of them twice with the machine set on nº9. Fold the strip in half matching the ends and pass it again starting from the free ends to the folded edge. Repeat twice.
      Then set the machine to nº8 and repeat the folding and pressing twice and then reducing the gap between the machine’s cylinders. The sheet will become slightly sticky and this will create a bubble of air at the centre of the folded edge which will pop when going through the cylinders. It will mean the dough has gained the right consistency and from now on, you will only need to thin out the sheet. the sheet is thin enough for tagliatelle when it’s half a millimetre to one millimetre thick.
      For pappardelle you will need to stop when it is one and a half millimetre thick.

  • 7.
    Resting the “sfoglia” folded up in a tablecloth

    • The rolled out “sfoglia”
    • One tablecloth
    • Flour - as needed

      Fold the dough sheet into a tablecloth dust it lightly with flour and let it rest for at least 10 minutes. I suggest letting it rest it for 30 minutes again (step 7 - pic. A-B).
      This will allow the sheet to dry slightly so, when you cut it, the cut edges won’t stick to each other.

  • 8.
    Cutting the rested “sfoglia” with a the knife

    • The rested “sfoglia”
    • Flour - as needed
    • One kneading board
    • One sharp square blade knife or chef knife

      Just before cooking time, put the dough sheet on the kneading board and cut it in half. Put the two halves on top of each other (step 8 - pic. A), match the edges and fold them over creating a flat roll (step 8 - pic. B). With a sharp knife, cut the roll into 1,5 to 2cm large strips to make pappardelle (step 8 - pic. C). Fettuccine are 1cm large, tagliatelle are 5 to 7mm large, tagliolini are 2 to 3 mm large.
      Unroll each pappardella on the kneading board and dust them with flour, or if you want to dry it out and make it last for one or two days, put them on a pasta dryer. You might need to cut the longest strips in half, as they should be no longer than 28-30cm to make them easy to eat.

Rate this recipe

Homemade fresh pasta
  • 1 People Rated This Recipe

  • Average Rating

    (5 / 5)

No comments yet.

Hi Reader, thanks for sharing your thoughts with us!

Be Social

Related Posts

  • Servings : 4
  • Cook Time : 90 Min
"Pappardelle with Tordi Matti Skewers" recipe - "Pappardelle ai Tordi Matti"
  • Servings : 6
  • Cook Time : 180 Min
"Bolognese Ragù with Green Tagliatelle" recipe
  • Servings : 4
  • Cook Time : 15 Min
"Tagliatelle with Red Radicchio of Treviso" recipe
  • Servings : 5-6
  • Cook Time : 20 Min
Homemade pappardelle in mushrooms sauce