Homemade pappardelle in mushrooms sauce

Homemade pappardelle with mushrooms sauce
Pappardelle ai funghi

    • Prep Time
    • Minutes
    • Cook Time
    • Minutes

Homemade pappardelle in mushrooms sauce - the ingredients

Total Cost: UK/£ 7,81*

Cost/portion: UK/£ 1,56*

A match made in heaven

Home made fresh pasta and mushroom sauce is a match made in heaven. Any shape of pasta can do, but I love how the large pappardelle strips go together with the meaty, juicy and buttery pieces of mushrooms.

The sauce is very simple to make but extremely rich in flavours: mushrooms are fried in butter, while rosemary and garlic enhance their underwood scent. Then the parley adds its grassy notes and the raw butter and cheese embrace all with a milky and slightly acidic hints.

Making your own fresh pasta

Making your own fresh pasta might require a longer time and a more effort… but what a satisfaction!  To ease things out, you might want to make a larger amount of pasta one day in advance,  and let is dry on a wooden rack, so it can be stored for 3 or 4 days and be ready for this and other recipes.

In this recipe, I summarized the instructions for making pasta in one step only, but you can click here to follow the full “step by step” recipe for it. If you roll out the dough with a rolling pin, remember to rest the “sfoglia” for at least 10 minutes before cutting it. Pasta machine’s basic equipments do not normally have the pappardelle cutting cylinders, so I suggest that you thin out the pasta strips as large as possible and then cut them as instructed on step 8 (pic. C). Tagliatelle size would be too thin and would need a sauce with a finer texture and cream.

Related post:

Homemade Italian fresh pasta: the “sfoglia” 

Note for the users: please click on the label “HOW TO” to watch the slide-show of each cooking step.

* Please note that both total cost and cost per portion are approximate and that can vary according to seasons and to different conditions.

Recipe Rating

  • (1 Rating)

Ingredients

  • for the pasta

  • Eggs - 180gr*

  • Plain weak four - 300gr (protein percentage from 9,3% to 10,2%)*

  • Back-up flour - 2tbs*

  • Flour - as needed*

  • click here to follow the full "step by step" recipe for fresh pasta making
  • Fresh water - 5lt

  • Salt - 30gr

  • for the sauce

  • Dry porcini mushrooms - 15gr

  • Lukewarm water - 750ml

  • Fresh parsley sprigs - 20gr

  • Fresh rosemary sprigs - 2

  • Shallots - 45gr

  • Mixed fresh mushrooms - 200gr

  • Butter - 60gr [part 1 of 2]

  • "Suited garlic” cloves - 4

  • Black pepper corn - 2gr

  • Salt - a pinch

  • Salt - 2gr or to taste

  • Butter - 40gr [part 2 of2]

  • Parmigiano cheese - 75gr

  • Utensils for pasta making

  • One long rolling pin

  • Olive oil - 1tbs

  • Kitchen paper

  • One scale

  • One large kneading board

  • Two small bowls

  • One fork

  • Cling film

  • One scraper

  • One table cloth

  • One sharp square blade knife of chef knife

  • Utensils for the sauce and for cooking pasta

  • One kitchen towel

  • One chopping board

  • One paring knife

  • One sharp chef knife

  • Cooking string

  • One pestle and mortar

  • One brush

  • Kitchen paper

  • Two medium bowls

  • One sieve and a muslin

  • One large frying pan

  • One 4-6lt saucepan

  • One small jug or ladle

  • One zester or grater

  • One large strainer or a pasta server

  • Two wooden spoons of silicon spatulas (if necessary)

  • One large bowl

Instructions

  • 1.
    Making the “sfoglia” for pappardelle

    • Eggs - 180gr*
    • Plain weak four - 300gr (protein percentage from 9,3% to 10,2%)*
    • Back-up flour - 2tbs*
    • Flour - as needed*
    • Olive oil - 1tbs
    • Kitchen paper
    • One scale
    • One large kneading board
    • Two small bowls
    • One fork
    • Cling film
    • One scraper
    • One table cloth

      Break the eggs into a medium sized bowl and whisk them with a fork, possibly without incorporating any air. Sieve the flour onto the kneading board and keep aside a quarter of it to be added later. Make a large well and place the eggs at the centre. Gradually incorporate flour into the eggs using the fork. Then with the scraper, mix all the flour of the well with the eggs and add also the flour from the quarter you left aside. Roughly make a ball with the mixture and knead it until it becomes perfectly smooth and elastic (step 1 - pic. A). Wrap it tightly with cling film and put it in the fridge to rest for 10 to 30 minutes. Oil the rolling pin with olive oil using a kitchen paper and set aside.
      Roll out the dough into a 1,5mm thin “sfoglia” sheet, dust it with flour and wrap it in a tablecloth. Let it rest for 10 to 30 minutes (step 1 - pic. B). Clean the kneading board scraping off any remnants of dry dough.

  • 2.
    Preparing the herbs, shallots and dry mushrooms

    • Dry porcini mushrooms - 15gr
    • Lukewarm water - 750ml
    • Fresh parsley sprigs - 20gr
    • Fresh rosemary sprigs - 2
    • Shallots - 45gr
    • Black pepper corn - 2gr
    • One sieve
    • One kitchen towel
    • One chopping board
    • One paring knife
    • One sharp chef knife
    • Cooking string
    • One pestle and mortar
    • One medium bowls

      Put the dry mushrooms into the sieve and rinse them under cold running water to get rid of any dust or sand. Then put them into a medium bowl and pour in the 750ml of lukewarm water. Let them soak for 15 minutes.
      Meanwhile, wash the parsley and the rosemary under running water and dry gently with a kitchen cloth. Separate the parsley leaves and stalks and tie these up into two small bunches and set aside.
      Then, with the paring knife, cut off the shallot’s tip and clean its roots. Get rid of its tunics and cut it into a fine brunoise and set aside.
      Crush the black pepper corns into the mortar and set aside.

      Note about cutting the shallot into brunoise

      With a paring knife, chop off the tip of the shallot. Clean the roots, halve it and peel off the tunics. Put each half facing down on a chopping board. With either the paring knife or the tip of the chef knife, make vertical cuts - 2millimeters apart from each other - driving the tip of the knife as close to the roots as possible. Hold the shallot together with one hand’s fingers, get the chef knife and with a fulcrum movement complete the mincing with narrow cuts.

  • 3.
    Cleaning the fresh mushrooms

    • Mixed fresh mushrooms - 200gr
    • The soaked porcini mushrooms
    • One chopping board
    • One paring knife
    • One sharp chef knife
    • One brush
    • Kitchen paper
    • One chopping board
    • One sharp chef knife

      Brush the mushrooms to get rid of any dirt. Cut off their root, dampen a kitchen paper sheet with fresh water and wipe their heads and stalks (step 3 - pic. A-B).
      When the porcini mushrooms have soften completely, take them out of their bowl, put the muslin into the sieve and filter their liquor into a clean bowl. Set this aside to be added to the boiling water afterwards. With the chef knife, cut the larger mushrooms into thin slices and set aside. (step 3 - pic. C).

  • 4.
    Frying the base for the sauce and putting on the water to boil

    • The clean rosemary sprigs
    • The parsley stalk bunches
    • Butter - 60gr [part 1 of 2]
    • “Suited garlic” cloves - 4
    • The shallot brunoise
    • Salt - a pinch
    • Ground black pepper - a pinch
    • Fresh water - 5lt
    • Parmigiano cheese - 75gr
    • One large frying pan
    • One 4-6lt saucepan
    • One zester or grater

      Put the saucepan with the 5lt of water on a high heat and add the other parsley bunch.
      Put the large frying pan on a medium heat, then add the butter with the garlic cloves and the rosemary sprigs (step 4 - pic. A). When the butter has melted completely and has started to bubble, add the parsley stalks bunch and the shallots, season them with a pinch of salt and black pepper and let them cook until golden (step 4 - pic. B).
      Finely grate the parmigiano cheese and set aside.

      Note about salt and water for pasta

      If you think you might forget to salt water before adding pasta, you can salt water right after putting it on heat. This can become a safe routine, but the commonly unknown result of this is that it will require a longer time to come to the boiling temperature of 100ºC. It would be better instead to wait for the boiling to start and then carefully add the salt. The addiction of salt at this stage causes a sudden increase of the temperature of the solution for a couple of seconds during which the water increases the bubbling and risks to pour out if the pan’s sides are not sufficiently high.

      So the right pan should be taller than its diameter and capacious enough to contain a good amount of water.

      The minimum ratio between water and pasta is 1lt every 100gr. Although, for small amount of pasta it’s better to use a fairly large and deep pan which will keep the water to temperature also after dropping the pasta in. So that’s why I prefer to use 5lt of water even just to cook a single portion of pasta.

      Another important detail of which to take care, is the right quantity of salt to add to the water. It depends on the quantity of salt the condiment for pasta is going to contain and the cooking time that pasta requires; not only on your personal taste.

      A normal dose of salt is 11-12gr per litre of water and it can be increased to a maximum of 14-15gr for those who like their food to be particularly savoury. When using ingredients which are already salty themselves, like bacon or ham, the dose can be lowered to a minimum of 9-10gr per litre of water, as well as when you know that you will bind pasta with a lot of its own cooking water.

      Keep also in mind that longer cooking time require smaller doses of salt whereas quicker cooking will need a larger dose.

  • 5.
    Frying the mushrooms and flavouring the water for pasta

    • The fresh and soaked mushrooms
    • The porcini mushrooms liquor
    • Salt - 2gr or to taste
    • Ground black pepper
    • The parsley leaves
    • The rested sheet of dough
    • One ladle
    • The saucepan with the boiling water
    • One choping board
    • One chef knife
    • One kneading board

      Add the mushrooms into the frying pan, stir evenly and allow them cook and soften adding one small ladle of porcini mushrooms liquor (step 5 - pic. A). The mushrooms will first absorb the fat giving it back when cooked. Season them with 2gr of salt - or to taste - and with some ground black pepper. Stir evenly, then take out the rosemary sprigs and the parsley bunch (step 5 - pic. B).
      Lower the heat to the minimum power.
      Finely mince the parsley leaves and set aside (step 5 - pic. C).
      When the water for pasta starts boiling, add all the porcini mushrooms liquor to it and let it come to the boiling again (step 5 - pic. D).
      Just before cooking time, put the dough sheet on the kneading board and cut it in half. Put the two halves on top of each other, match the edges and fold them over creating a flat roll. With a sharp knife, cut the roll into 1,5 to 2cm large strips to make pappardelle (step 5 - pic. E).
      Unroll each pappardella on the kneading board and dust them with flour. You might need to cut the longest strips in half, as they should be no longer than 28-30cm to make them easy to eat.

  • 6.
    Cooking and binding pappardelle with the sauce

    • The boiling flavoured water
    • The pappardelle
    • Salt - 30gr
    • The cooked mushrooms
    • The minced parley
    • Ground black papper - a pinch
    • Butter - 40gr [part 2 of2]
    • The grated parmigiano cheese - 75gr
    • One large strainer or a pasta server
    • One ladle
    • Two wooden spoons or silicon spatulas (if necessary)
    • One large bowl

      Add the 30gr of salt to the boiling water and add the pappardelle to it. It will only take a couple of minutes to cook the pasta, so stir it frequently to prevent them from sticking to each other(step 6 - pic. A).
      Put the cooked mushrooms, the minced parsley and the butter into a large bowl and season to taste with grated black pepper(step 6 - pic. B).
      Collect about 15ml or 20ml of cooking water with a ladle before straining the pasta and put it aside in a small receptacle.
      When the pappardelle will come up to the surface, leave them cook for another 30seconds, then strain immediately into the bowl using a pasta server, so some of the cooking liquor will moist the sauce. Add the grated parmigiano cheese and stir with the wooden spoons (step 6 - pic. C). If you see the pasta gets too dry, add some cooking liquor and stir again.
      Serve immediately.

Instructions

  • 1.
    Making the “sfoglia” for pappardelle

    • Eggs - 180gr*
    • Plain weak four - 300gr (protein percentage from 9,3% to 10,2%)*
    • Back-up flour - 2tbs*
    • Flour - as needed*
    • Olive oil - 1tbs
    • Kitchen paper
    • One scale
    • One large kneading board
    • Two small bowls
    • One fork
    • Cling film
    • One scraper
    • One table cloth

      Break the eggs into a medium sized bowl and whisk them with a fork, possibly without incorporating any air. Sieve the flour onto the kneading board and keep aside a quarter of it to be added later. Make a large well and place the eggs at the centre. Gradually incorporate flour into the eggs using the fork. Then with the scraper, mix all the flour of the well with the eggs and add also the flour from the quarter you left aside. Roughly make a ball with the mixture and knead it until it becomes perfectly smooth and elastic (step 1 - pic. A). Wrap it tightly with cling film and put it in the fridge to rest for 10 to 30 minutes. Oil the rolling pin with olive oil using a kitchen paper and set aside.
      Roll out the dough into a 1,5mm thin “sfoglia” sheet, dust it with flour and wrap it in a tablecloth. Let it rest for 10 to 30 minutes (step 1 - pic. B). Clean the kneading board scraping off any remnants of dry dough.

  • 2.
    Preparing the herbs, shallots and dry mushrooms

    • Dry porcini mushrooms - 15gr
    • Lukewarm water - 750ml
    • Fresh parsley sprigs - 20gr
    • Fresh rosemary sprigs - 2
    • Shallots - 45gr
    • Black pepper corn - 2gr
    • One sieve
    • One kitchen towel
    • One chopping board
    • One paring knife
    • One sharp chef knife
    • Cooking string
    • One pestle and mortar
    • One medium bowls

      Put the dry mushrooms into the sieve and rinse them under cold running water to get rid of any dust or sand. Then put them into a medium bowl and pour in the 750ml of lukewarm water. Let them soak for 15 minutes.
      Meanwhile, wash the parsley and the rosemary under running water and dry gently with a kitchen cloth. Separate the parsley leaves and stalks and tie these up into two small bunches and set aside.
      Then, with the paring knife, cut off the shallot’s tip and clean its roots. Get rid of its tunics and cut it into a fine brunoise and set aside.
      Crush the black pepper corns into the mortar and set aside.

      Note about cutting the shallot into brunoise

      With a paring knife, chop off the tip of the shallot. Clean the roots, halve it and peel off the tunics. Put each half facing down on a chopping board. With either the paring knife or the tip of the chef knife, make vertical cuts - 2millimeters apart from each other - driving the tip of the knife as close to the roots as possible. Hold the shallot together with one hand’s fingers, get the chef knife and with a fulcrum movement complete the mincing with narrow cuts.

  • 3.
    Cleaning the fresh mushrooms

    • Mixed fresh mushrooms - 200gr
    • The soaked porcini mushrooms
    • One chopping board
    • One paring knife
    • One sharp chef knife
    • One brush
    • Kitchen paper
    • One chopping board
    • One sharp chef knife

      Brush the mushrooms to get rid of any dirt. Cut off their root, dampen a kitchen paper sheet with fresh water and wipe their heads and stalks (step 3 - pic. A-B).
      When the porcini mushrooms have soften completely, take them out of their bowl, put the muslin into the sieve and filter their liquor into a clean bowl. Set this aside to be added to the boiling water afterwards. With the chef knife, cut the larger mushrooms into thin slices and set aside. (step 3 - pic. C).

  • 4.
    Frying the base for the sauce and putting on the water to boil

    • The clean rosemary sprigs
    • The parsley stalk bunches
    • Butter - 60gr [part 1 of 2]
    • “Suited garlic” cloves - 4
    • The shallot brunoise
    • Salt - a pinch
    • Ground black pepper - a pinch
    • Fresh water - 5lt
    • Parmigiano cheese - 75gr
    • One large frying pan
    • One 4-6lt saucepan
    • One zester or grater

      Put the saucepan with the 5lt of water on a high heat and add the other parsley bunch.
      Put the large frying pan on a medium heat, then add the butter with the garlic cloves and the rosemary sprigs (step 4 - pic. A). When the butter has melted completely and has started to bubble, add the parsley stalks bunch and the shallots, season them with a pinch of salt and black pepper and let them cook until golden (step 4 - pic. B).
      Finely grate the parmigiano cheese and set aside.

      Note about salt and water for pasta

      If you think you might forget to salt water before adding pasta, you can salt water right after putting it on heat. This can become a safe routine, but the commonly unknown result of this is that it will require a longer time to come to the boiling temperature of 100ºC. It would be better instead to wait for the boiling to start and then carefully add the salt. The addiction of salt at this stage causes a sudden increase of the temperature of the solution for a couple of seconds during which the water increases the bubbling and risks to pour out if the pan’s sides are not sufficiently high.

      So the right pan should be taller than its diameter and capacious enough to contain a good amount of water.

      The minimum ratio between water and pasta is 1lt every 100gr. Although, for small amount of pasta it’s better to use a fairly large and deep pan which will keep the water to temperature also after dropping the pasta in. So that’s why I prefer to use 5lt of water even just to cook a single portion of pasta.

      Another important detail of which to take care, is the right quantity of salt to add to the water. It depends on the quantity of salt the condiment for pasta is going to contain and the cooking time that pasta requires; not only on your personal taste.

      A normal dose of salt is 11-12gr per litre of water and it can be increased to a maximum of 14-15gr for those who like their food to be particularly savoury. When using ingredients which are already salty themselves, like bacon or ham, the dose can be lowered to a minimum of 9-10gr per litre of water, as well as when you know that you will bind pasta with a lot of its own cooking water.

      Keep also in mind that longer cooking time require smaller doses of salt whereas quicker cooking will need a larger dose.

  • 5.
    Frying the mushrooms and flavouring the water for pasta

    • The fresh and soaked mushrooms
    • The porcini mushrooms liquor
    • Salt - 2gr or to taste
    • Ground black pepper
    • The parsley leaves
    • The rested sheet of dough
    • One ladle
    • The saucepan with the boiling water
    • One choping board
    • One chef knife
    • One kneading board

      Add the mushrooms into the frying pan, stir evenly and allow them cook and soften adding one small ladle of porcini mushrooms liquor (step 5 - pic. A). The mushrooms will first absorb the fat giving it back when cooked. Season them with 2gr of salt - or to taste - and with some ground black pepper. Stir evenly, then take out the rosemary sprigs and the parsley bunch (step 5 - pic. B).
      Lower the heat to the minimum power.
      Finely mince the parsley leaves and set aside (step 5 - pic. C).
      When the water for pasta starts boiling, add all the porcini mushrooms liquor to it and let it come to the boiling again (step 5 - pic. D).
      Just before cooking time, put the dough sheet on the kneading board and cut it in half. Put the two halves on top of each other, match the edges and fold them over creating a flat roll. With a sharp knife, cut the roll into 1,5 to 2cm large strips to make pappardelle (step 5 - pic. E).
      Unroll each pappardella on the kneading board and dust them with flour. You might need to cut the longest strips in half, as they should be no longer than 28-30cm to make them easy to eat.

  • 6.
    Cooking and binding pappardelle with the sauce

    • The boiling flavoured water
    • The pappardelle
    • Salt - 30gr
    • The cooked mushrooms
    • The minced parley
    • Ground black papper - a pinch
    • Butter - 40gr [part 2 of2]
    • The grated parmigiano cheese - 75gr
    • One large strainer or a pasta server
    • One ladle
    • Two wooden spoons or silicon spatulas (if necessary)
    • One large bowl

      Add the 30gr of salt to the boiling water and add the pappardelle to it. It will only take a couple of minutes to cook the pasta, so stir it frequently to prevent them from sticking to each other(step 6 - pic. A).
      Put the cooked mushrooms, the minced parsley and the butter into a large bowl and season to taste with grated black pepper(step 6 - pic. B).
      Collect about 15ml or 20ml of cooking water with a ladle before straining the pasta and put it aside in a small receptacle.
      When the pappardelle will come up to the surface, leave them cook for another 30seconds, then strain immediately into the bowl using a pasta server, so some of the cooking liquor will moist the sauce. Add the grated parmigiano cheese and stir with the wooden spoons (step 6 - pic. C). If you see the pasta gets too dry, add some cooking liquor and stir again.
      Serve immediately.

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