Linguine with Summer Pesto recipe

Linguine with “Summer pesto” recipe

    • Prep Time
    • Minutes
    • Cook Time
    • Minutes
    • Difficulty Level

Pesto – Total Cost: UK/£ 7,75* – Cost/KG: UK/£ 7,86*

Linguine with sauce – Total Cost: UK/£ 4,12* – Cost/portion: UK/£ 1,37*

Utensils you might need

Utensils for the pesto

 One blender

One paring knife

One medium bowl <em>[1 of 2]</em>

One strainer

 Utensils for the sauce

 One large frying pan

One towel

Two wooden spoons or two silicone spatulas

 Utensils for the pasta

 One large saucepan

One large strainer

One medium bowl <em>[2 of 2]</em>

One ladle

One large bowl

Please note that you will get about 800gr of pesto with the quantities I am suggesting, but you will need only about 200gr of it to bind the pasta. The rest can be stored in fridge for a couple of days.

Related posts

Summer Pesto sauce

Note for the users: please click on the label “HOW TO” to watch the slide-show of each cooking step.

* Please note that both total cost and cost per portion are approximate and that can vary according to seasons and to different conditions.

Recipe Rating

  • (1 Rating)

Ingredients

  • for the pesto (enough for about 800gr of pesto - you will need about 200gr for the recipe)

  • Beefheart Tomatoes - 2 medium [about 500gr]

  • Pitted Olives - 100gr [part 1 of 2]

  • Pine Nuts - 90gr [part 1 of 2]

  • Salad Onions - 2 (or 1 quite small Sweet Onion)

  • Peeled garlic cloves - 1

  • Basil leaves - 10gr

  • Extra Virgin Olive Oil - 60gr [part 1 of 2]

  • Pink pepper corns - 5 or 6 grains

  • Salt - as needed

  • for the sauce

  • Extra Virgin Olive Oil - 50gr [part 2 of 2]

  • Pitted Olives - 60gr [part 2 of 2]

  • Pine Nuts - 10gr [part 2 of 2]

  • "Suited garlic” cloves - 2

  • Pink Pepper - some grains (optional)

  • Cooking water - about 20ml or 25ml

  • for the pasta

  • Linguine - 240gr

  • Water* - 5lt

  • Salt* - 50gr

  • *If you want to use less water: not less than 3lt (see the main note about boiling pasta). Then you can reduce the salt to 30gr.

Instructions

  • 1.
    Boiling the water

    • Water - 5lt

      Put the saucepan with the water on a high heat. The water will take from 18 to 20 minutes to get to a constant boiling.

      Note about salt and water for pasta

      If you think you might forget to salt water before adding pasta, you can salt water right after putting it on heat. This can become a safe routine, but the commonly unknown result of this is that it will require a longer time to come to the boiling temperature of 100ºC. It would be better instead to wait for the boiling to start and then carefully add the salt. The addiction of salt at this stage causes a sudden increase of the temperature of the solution for a couple of seconds during which the water increases the bubbling and risks to pour out if the pan’s sides are not sufficiently high.

      So the right pan should be taller than its diameter and capacious enough to contain a good amount of water.

      The minimum ratio between water and pasta is 1lt every 100gr. Although, for small amount of pasta it’s better to use a fairly large and deep pan which will keep the water to temperature also after dropping the pasta in. So that’s why I prefer to use 5lt of water even just to cook a single portion of pasta.

      Another important detail of which to take care, is the right quantity of salt to add to the water. It depends on the quantity of salt the condiment for pasta is going to contain and the cooking time that pasta requires; not only on your personal taste.

      A normal dose of salt is 11-12gr per litre of water and it can be increased to a maximum of 14-15gr for those who like their food to be particularly savoury. When using ingredients which are already salty themselves, like bacon or ham, the dose can be lowered to a minimum of 9-10gr per litre of water, as well as when you know that you will bind pasta with a lot of its own cooking water.

      Keep also in mind that longer cooking time requires smaller doses of salt whereas quicker cooking will need a larger dose.

  • 2.
    Preparing the vegetables for the pesto

    • Beefheart Tomatoes - 2 medium (about 500gr)
    • Pitted Olives - 160gr
    • Salad Onions - 2 (or 1 quite small Sweet Onion)
    • Peeled garlic cloves - 1
    • Basil leaves - 10gr

      Wash the tomatoes and dry them. Cut off the top ends and cut them into quarters. Clean them of all the seeds. Put the chopped pieces in a sieve and place this on the edge of a slightly larger and deeper bowl: let them rest there and drain the water from inside, so the pesto will result thick and creamy.
      Wash the pitted olives from their brine and then put them in a medium bowl. Cover them in warm water. Set aside until you will need them for blending the pesto. This technique enhances the flavor of olives and works well with capers too. But water must not be hot, otherwise the heat will ruin the pesto (see the note about pesto).
      Thoroughly wash the basil, then separate the leaves from the stalks. Put the leaves on a cloth to dry and set aside.
      Chop off the onions’s ends and cut them into quarters: peel the garlic clove, halve it and take the green gem off if present.

  • 3.
    Frying the base of olives and pine nuts

    • Extra Virgin Olive Oil - 50gr
    • Pitted Olives - 60g
    • Pine Nuts - 10gr
    • “Suited Garlic” cloves - 2
    • Pink Pepper - some grains (optional)

      Put the frying pan on medium heat and put the extra virgin olive oil in it together with the “Suited Garlic” cloves.
      Drain the hot water and thoroughly dry the olives with a towel. Keep aside 100gr of them and add the remaining olives to the frying oil and garlic.
      Lower the heat and set it to a minimum, then add 10gr of pine nuts and some pink pepper grains.

  • 4.
    Putting the pasta to boil

    • Water** - 5lt (boiling)
    • Salt** - 50gr
    • **If you want to use less water (not less than 3lt - see then main note about boiling pasta) the you can reduce the salt to 30gr.

    • Linguine -240gr
      As soon as the water starts boiling, add the 50gr of salt and after the boiling has settled again, add the pasta. Stir frequently for the first few minutes to avoid the pasta sticking to the bottom or to each other.

      Linguine will take about 10 minutes to cook (check the timing on the packaging), but you will need to strain them 2 or 3 minutes earlier: keep a couple of ladles of the cooking water to add it to the pasta while binding it with the base in the frying pan.

  • 5.
    Blending the pesto

    • The chopped and drained tomatoes
    • Pitted Olives - 100g
    • Pine Nuts - 90gr
    • Salad Onions (or Sweet Onion) - 2 (into quarters)
    • Peeled garlic cloves - 1
    • Basil leaves - 10gr
    • Extra Virgin Olive Oil - 60gr
    • Pink pepper corns - 5 or 6 grains
    • Salt - as needed

      Blend all the ingredients together. Make sure there are no lumps left: it must be an even and smooth emulsion. If needed, you can add some oil to it.

      Note about pesto

      The word “Pesto” means “crushed” or “mashed”; so, in respect of tradition, any pesto should be made using a pestle and mortar. But nowadays it is not so easy to get a properly good sized pestle and mortar in white marble without spending a lot of money, and the lack of time we all experience in our lives make the choice of using a blender just sensible and acceptable.
      Although, it is a choice which comes with an inconvenience: the blades produce heat, particularly if the blending takes longer. And heat can alter flavors. So, if possible, it is a good idea to use only cold ingredients, preparing them all in advance. Some people also freeze the blender bowl and the blades to keep the vivid colours of the main ingredients such as basil, parsley, rocket or tomatoes.
      Moreover, the use of oil in blenders bleaches colours: tomato pesto turn pink and basil pesto looses its vivid green tone (naughty chefs blanch the basil for a couple of seconds in hot boiling water to avoid this, but genuine pesto lovers think that it’s just a tasteless cheat).
      Please note that you will get about 800gr of pesto with the quantities I am suggesting, but you will need only about 200gr of it to bind the pasta. The rest can be stored in fridge for a couple of days.

  • 6.
    Straining the pasta

      Seven or eight minutes have passed since you dropped the linguine into the water. They will not be ready yet and if you lift one strand with a fork, you will see that it does not hang vertically as if it was perfectly cooked “al dente”.
      Collect about 20ml or 25ml of cooking water with a ladle and put aside in a receptacle.
      Drain the pasta thoroughly with a strainer. Do not let it dry completely: the water that coasts the linguine will protect them from the thermic shock they will undergo when tossing in the frying pan. If you have a pasta server, instead, simply collect all pasta from the saucepan and put it directly into the frying pan.

      Note about the correct cooking point "al dente”

      ”Al dente” literally means ”to the tooth”. It indicates the perfect consistency that pasta, or any other food, should have at the end of the cooking process: not too soft and not too hard while chewing. Pasta cooked ”al dente” maintains a harder consistency at the centre of the dough sheet which gives the diners a pleasant feeling of ”biting” rather than ”mushing” something under their teeth.

  • 7.
    Binding the linguine and the fried base

    • Drained linguine
    • Cooking water – about 20ml or 25ml

    • The frying pan with the base of olives and pine nuts

      Bring the heat to a medium-high level; then immediately add all the linguine. Stir and toss quickly with the two spoons then add one ladle of cooking water and keep tossing and stirring frequently.
      The oil and the water will reduce quickly and cook the pasta, the starch of which - dissolved in the liquor - will thicken the sauce. Add another ladle if you think that the pasta needs to cook  a little longer.

      Note about binding pasta

      As for rice, almost all recipes require pasta to be bound together with its sauce and tossed over heat. This allows the sauce to grab to the surface of pasta, whether it is smooth or lined or bronze wire-drawn, so that every forkful will have its perfect balance of flavors and textures. Otherwise, sauce would slip away while eating and you would end up with a good quantity of the sauce still on the bottom of the bowl. Another very good idea, even if not allowed by etiquette, is to eat pasta - any kind of pasta - with some nice fresh crusty bread. Bread’s starchy flavor enhances both the flavors of the sauce and the pasta dough itself.

  • 8.
    Mixing the pasta with the pesto

    • The pesto
    • The linguine tossed with the base

      Put one ladle of pesto at the bottom of a large bowl and add the linguine you have just bound with the base.
      Stir evenly and then gradually add more as much pesto as needed to generously coat the pasta.
      Serve immediately.

Linguine with Summer Pesto recipeLinguine with Summer Pesto recipeLinguine with Summer Pesto recipeLinguine with Summer Pesto recipeLinguine with Summer Pesto recipeLinguine with Summer Pesto recipeLinguine with Summer Pesto recipe

Instructions

  • 1.
    Boiling the water

    • Water - 5lt

      Put the saucepan with the water on a high heat. The water will take from 18 to 20 minutes to get to a constant boiling.

      Note about salt and water for pasta

      If you think you might forget to salt water before adding pasta, you can salt water right after putting it on heat. This can become a safe routine, but the commonly unknown result of this is that it will require a longer time to come to the boiling temperature of 100ºC. It would be better instead to wait for the boiling to start and then carefully add the salt. The addiction of salt at this stage causes a sudden increase of the temperature of the solution for a couple of seconds during which the water increases the bubbling and risks to pour out if the pan’s sides are not sufficiently high.

      So the right pan should be taller than its diameter and capacious enough to contain a good amount of water.

      The minimum ratio between water and pasta is 1lt every 100gr. Although, for small amount of pasta it’s better to use a fairly large and deep pan which will keep the water to temperature also after dropping the pasta in. So that’s why I prefer to use 5lt of water even just to cook a single portion of pasta.

      Another important detail of which to take care, is the right quantity of salt to add to the water. It depends on the quantity of salt the condiment for pasta is going to contain and the cooking time that pasta requires; not only on your personal taste.

      A normal dose of salt is 11-12gr per litre of water and it can be increased to a maximum of 14-15gr for those who like their food to be particularly savoury. When using ingredients which are already salty themselves, like bacon or ham, the dose can be lowered to a minimum of 9-10gr per litre of water, as well as when you know that you will bind pasta with a lot of its own cooking water.

      Keep also in mind that longer cooking time requires smaller doses of salt whereas quicker cooking will need a larger dose.

  • 2.
    Preparing the vegetables for the pesto

    • Beefheart Tomatoes - 2 medium (about 500gr)
    • Pitted Olives - 160gr
    • Salad Onions - 2 (or 1 quite small Sweet Onion)
    • Peeled garlic cloves - 1
    • Basil leaves - 10gr

      Wash the tomatoes and dry them. Cut off the top ends and cut them into quarters. Clean them of all the seeds. Put the chopped pieces in a sieve and place this on the edge of a slightly larger and deeper bowl: let them rest there and drain the water from inside, so the pesto will result thick and creamy.
      Wash the pitted olives from their brine and then put them in a medium bowl. Cover them in warm water. Set aside until you will need them for blending the pesto. This technique enhances the flavor of olives and works well with capers too. But water must not be hot, otherwise the heat will ruin the pesto (see the note about pesto).
      Thoroughly wash the basil, then separate the leaves from the stalks. Put the leaves on a cloth to dry and set aside.
      Chop off the onions’s ends and cut them into quarters: peel the garlic clove, halve it and take the green gem off if present.

  • 3.
    Frying the base of olives and pine nuts

    • Extra Virgin Olive Oil - 50gr
    • Pitted Olives - 60g
    • Pine Nuts - 10gr
    • “Suited Garlic” cloves - 2
    • Pink Pepper - some grains (optional)

      Put the frying pan on medium heat and put the extra virgin olive oil in it together with the “Suited Garlic” cloves.
      Drain the hot water and thoroughly dry the olives with a towel. Keep aside 100gr of them and add the remaining olives to the frying oil and garlic.
      Lower the heat and set it to a minimum, then add 10gr of pine nuts and some pink pepper grains.

  • 4.
    Putting the pasta to boil

    • Water** - 5lt (boiling)
    • Salt** - 50gr
    • **If you want to use less water (not less than 3lt - see then main note about boiling pasta) the you can reduce the salt to 30gr.

    • Linguine -240gr
      As soon as the water starts boiling, add the 50gr of salt and after the boiling has settled again, add the pasta. Stir frequently for the first few minutes to avoid the pasta sticking to the bottom or to each other.

      Linguine will take about 10 minutes to cook (check the timing on the packaging), but you will need to strain them 2 or 3 minutes earlier: keep a couple of ladles of the cooking water to add it to the pasta while binding it with the base in the frying pan.

  • 5.
    Blending the pesto

    • The chopped and drained tomatoes
    • Pitted Olives - 100g
    • Pine Nuts - 90gr
    • Salad Onions (or Sweet Onion) - 2 (into quarters)
    • Peeled garlic cloves - 1
    • Basil leaves - 10gr
    • Extra Virgin Olive Oil - 60gr
    • Pink pepper corns - 5 or 6 grains
    • Salt - as needed

      Blend all the ingredients together. Make sure there are no lumps left: it must be an even and smooth emulsion. If needed, you can add some oil to it.

      Note about pesto

      The word “Pesto” means “crushed” or “mashed”; so, in respect of tradition, any pesto should be made using a pestle and mortar. But nowadays it is not so easy to get a properly good sized pestle and mortar in white marble without spending a lot of money, and the lack of time we all experience in our lives make the choice of using a blender just sensible and acceptable.
      Although, it is a choice which comes with an inconvenience: the blades produce heat, particularly if the blending takes longer. And heat can alter flavors. So, if possible, it is a good idea to use only cold ingredients, preparing them all in advance. Some people also freeze the blender bowl and the blades to keep the vivid colours of the main ingredients such as basil, parsley, rocket or tomatoes.
      Moreover, the use of oil in blenders bleaches colours: tomato pesto turn pink and basil pesto looses its vivid green tone (naughty chefs blanch the basil for a couple of seconds in hot boiling water to avoid this, but genuine pesto lovers think that it’s just a tasteless cheat).
      Please note that you will get about 800gr of pesto with the quantities I am suggesting, but you will need only about 200gr of it to bind the pasta. The rest can be stored in fridge for a couple of days.

  • 6.
    Straining the pasta

      Seven or eight minutes have passed since you dropped the linguine into the water. They will not be ready yet and if you lift one strand with a fork, you will see that it does not hang vertically as if it was perfectly cooked “al dente”.
      Collect about 20ml or 25ml of cooking water with a ladle and put aside in a receptacle.
      Drain the pasta thoroughly with a strainer. Do not let it dry completely: the water that coasts the linguine will protect them from the thermic shock they will undergo when tossing in the frying pan. If you have a pasta server, instead, simply collect all pasta from the saucepan and put it directly into the frying pan.

      Note about the correct cooking point "al dente”

      ”Al dente” literally means ”to the tooth”. It indicates the perfect consistency that pasta, or any other food, should have at the end of the cooking process: not too soft and not too hard while chewing. Pasta cooked ”al dente” maintains a harder consistency at the centre of the dough sheet which gives the diners a pleasant feeling of ”biting” rather than ”mushing” something under their teeth.

  • 7.
    Binding the linguine and the fried base

    • Drained linguine
    • Cooking water – about 20ml or 25ml

    • The frying pan with the base of olives and pine nuts

      Bring the heat to a medium-high level; then immediately add all the linguine. Stir and toss quickly with the two spoons then add one ladle of cooking water and keep tossing and stirring frequently.
      The oil and the water will reduce quickly and cook the pasta, the starch of which - dissolved in the liquor - will thicken the sauce. Add another ladle if you think that the pasta needs to cook  a little longer.

      Note about binding pasta

      As for rice, almost all recipes require pasta to be bound together with its sauce and tossed over heat. This allows the sauce to grab to the surface of pasta, whether it is smooth or lined or bronze wire-drawn, so that every forkful will have its perfect balance of flavors and textures. Otherwise, sauce would slip away while eating and you would end up with a good quantity of the sauce still on the bottom of the bowl. Another very good idea, even if not allowed by etiquette, is to eat pasta - any kind of pasta - with some nice fresh crusty bread. Bread’s starchy flavor enhances both the flavors of the sauce and the pasta dough itself.

  • 8.
    Mixing the pasta with the pesto

    • The pesto
    • The linguine tossed with the base

      Put one ladle of pesto at the bottom of a large bowl and add the linguine you have just bound with the base.
      Stir evenly and then gradually add more as much pesto as needed to generously coat the pasta.
      Serve immediately.

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