Pork tenderloin in milk cream with pan-fried fennels

Pork tenderloin in milk cream
“Filetto di maiale alla panna”

    • Prep Time
    • Minutes
    • Cook Time
    • Minutes

Pork tenderloin in milk cream with pan-fried fennels- the ingredients

Total Cost: UK/£ 9,94*

Cost/portion: UK/£ 3,31*

Rich, rich and… rich!

So good, tasty and tender that you can’t even imagine. I first saw this recipe in an old “La Cucina Italiana… problem is that I can’t remember in which one! But even though I haven’t been blessed with the gift of eidetic memory, I do remember all the ingredients. The method is totally mine and it combines together a couple of tricks I learned from Grandma G. and the legendary Giulia Child.

Anchovies? Yes, anchovies!

It’s a must! They give the dish a kick. You are not allowed to skip them. Period! Without anchovies, this dish would be just as flat as a bedside table…

Nobody will know they are there, and nobody will believe you when you will reveal the secret ingredient: I have friends who still think I was joking.

Side dishes  and cooking hints…

Any side dish can go well together with this recipe: pan-fried carrots in butter, roasted potatoes, or even a refreshing salad (possibly with pomegranate seeds in it). This time, I have put it together with pan-fried fennels with butter, because their aroma helps cleansing the palate from the rich creamy sauce.

Low temperature is essential. Double cream and milk quantities might vary depending on the size of your saucepan. Cooking times will vary according to the size of your tenderloin.

Personal advice: after a meal like this, stay away from any blood test for at least a couple of weeks!

Related posts:

Pan-fried fennels with butter – “Finocchi al burro”

Note for the users: please click on the label “HOW TO” to watch the slide-show of each cooking step.

* Please note that both total cost and cost per portion are approximate and that can vary according to seasons and to different conditions.

Recipe Rating

  • (1 Rating)

Ingredients

  • Butter - 30gr [part 1of 3]

  • Sage sprigs - 1 [part 1 of 2]

  • "Suited garlic”cloves - 2

  • Black pepper corns - 4gr

  • Sage - 2 large leaves

  • Butter - 20gr [part 2 of 3]

  • Anchovies - 10gr [part 1of 2]

  • Pork tenderloin - 600gr

  • Plain flour - about 80gr or as needed

  • Whole milk - 250ml

  • Double cream - 1lt

  • Butter - 30gr [part 3 of 3]

  • Anchovies - 20gr [part 2 of 2]

  • Sage sprigs - 1 [part 2 of 2]

  • Salt - 5gr

  • "Suited garlic”cloves - 2

  • Utensils

  • One saucepan with lid - large and high enough to fit the tenderloin piece

  • One pestle and mortar

  • One chopping board

  • One filleting knife

  • One brush

  • One plate

  • One thin metal sieve

  • One bowl

  • One wooden or silicone spatula

  • One chef knife

  • Tinfoil (optional)

Instructions

  • 1.
    Trimming the silver skin and searing the meat

    • Butter - 30gr [part 1of 3]
    • Sage sprigs - 1 [part 1 of 2]
    • “Suited garlic” - 2 cloves
    • One saucepan with lid - large and high enough to fit the tenderloin piece
    • One chopping board
    • One filleting knife

      Put the saucepan on a low heat with the butter, the sage and the garlic cloves. Let the butter melt completely and foam lightly (step 1 - pic. A).
      Meanwhile, trim off the tenderloin’s silver skin and throw it away. If necessary, cut off its irregular ends and bits, so to have a nice and clean shape (step 1 - pic. B).
      Set aside

  • 2.
    Making the dressing butter for brushing and larding the meat

    • Black pepper corns - 4gr
    • Sage - 2 large leaves
    • Butter - 20gr [part 2 of 3]
    • Anchovies - 10gr [part 1of 2]
    • One pestle and mortar

      Crush all the black pepper, then keep aside half of it.
      Add the sage into the mortar and crush it finely with the remaining black pepper (step 2 - pic. A).
      When done, add the anchovies one by one and crush them finely (step 2 - pic. B).
      Then add the butter and mix it with the other ingredients into a very smooth paste (step 2 - pic. C).

  • 3.
    Larding and brushing the tenderloin

    • The tenderloin and the good trims
    • The flavouring paste
    • One filleting knife
    • One brush

      Run the filleting knife’s blade longwise through the tenderloin creating a central cavity. If the tenderloin is quite long, do it on both sides (step 3 - pic. A).
      Fill the cavity with the flavouring paste using your fingers or a larding knife (step 3 - pic. B).
      With a brush, spread the remaining paste all over the piece of tenderloin and do the same with the diced meat (step 3 - pic. C).

  • 4.
    Searing the meat in hot butter and dusting it with flour

    • The brushed tenderloin and diced meat
    • The saucepan with the melted butter, sage and garlic
    • Plain flour - about 80gr or as needed
    • One plate

      Set the heat under the saucepan to a high power and let the butter get hotter. As soon as it starts sizzling and foaming, put in the meat in and thoroughly seal it on all sides and ends (step 4 - pic. A).
      Then, take the saucepan off the heat and take out the sealed meat.
      Dust the meat with a thin layer of flour (step 4 - pic. B).
      Put the saucepan back on a high heat and sear again the meat thoroughly (step 4 - pic. C).
      When done, take the meat out and set aside. Through away the burned butter with its flavouring herbs and clean the saucepan.

  • 5.
    Seasoning the meat and cooking it in milk cream

    • The sealed meat
    • The remaining black pepper
    • Salt - 5gr
    • Whole milk - 250m
    • Double cream - 1lt
    • Butter - 30gr [part 3 of 3]
    • Anchovies - 20gr [part 2 of 2]
    • Sage sprigs - 1 [part 2 of 2]
    • “Suited garlic” - 2 cloves
    • The clean saucepan with its lid

      Season the meat on all sides with a pinch of salt (step 5 - pic. A).
      Put the saucepan on a low heat and add the butter, the garlic cloves, the sage and the anchovies (step 5 - pic. B). Put in the meat.
      Mix the milk and the double cream together and pour it all into the saucepan, so the meat is almost completely covered in it (step 5 - pic. C).
      Cover the saucepan with its lid and let it cook gently for about 20 minutes, basting the meat if necessary and turning it from time to time.
      Then check the seasoning of the cream, adjusting it with the remaining salt according to your personal taste.
      Loosely cover the saucepan with its lid and let the sauce reduce for another 20minutes (step 5 - pic. D). Then take off the lid and let it cook for another 10 or 15 minutes always on a low heat and turning the meat from side to side.
      Let the sauce reduce almost by the half, but do not cook the meat any longer, or it will get tough and dry despite the cream and the butter in which it has been cooked.

  • 6.
    Filtering the sauce, chilling and cutting the meat

    • The saucepan with the meat and cream
    • One thin metal sieve
    • One bowl
    • One wooden or silicone spatula
    • One chopping board
    • One chef knife
    • Tinfoil (optional)

      Take the saucepan off the heat, take out the meat and set it aside. Wrap it in tinfoil and let it chill completely, but even if you are going to serve the pork in a short while, this will anyway allow to keep the juices inside the meat.
      Filter the sauce through a thin sieve and set aside (step 6 - pic. A-B).
      Clean the saucepan and put the sauce and the unwrapped meat back in.
      Before serving, reheat the sauce first and then add the meat to warm it up. Do not overheat, or it will get dry and tough. Also, a bain-marie might do a better job (step 6 - pic. C).

Instructions

  • 1.
    Trimming the silver skin and searing the meat

    • Butter - 30gr [part 1of 3]
    • Sage sprigs - 1 [part 1 of 2]
    • “Suited garlic” - 2 cloves
    • One saucepan with lid - large and high enough to fit the tenderloin piece
    • One chopping board
    • One filleting knife

      Put the saucepan on a low heat with the butter, the sage and the garlic cloves. Let the butter melt completely and foam lightly (step 1 - pic. A).
      Meanwhile, trim off the tenderloin’s silver skin and throw it away. If necessary, cut off its irregular ends and bits, so to have a nice and clean shape (step 1 - pic. B).
      Set aside

  • 2.
    Making the dressing butter for brushing and larding the meat

    • Black pepper corns - 4gr
    • Sage - 2 large leaves
    • Butter - 20gr [part 2 of 3]
    • Anchovies - 10gr [part 1of 2]
    • One pestle and mortar

      Crush all the black pepper, then keep aside half of it.
      Add the sage into the mortar and crush it finely with the remaining black pepper (step 2 - pic. A).
      When done, add the anchovies one by one and crush them finely (step 2 - pic. B).
      Then add the butter and mix it with the other ingredients into a very smooth paste (step 2 - pic. C).

  • 3.
    Larding and brushing the tenderloin

    • The tenderloin and the good trims
    • The flavouring paste
    • One filleting knife
    • One brush

      Run the filleting knife’s blade longwise through the tenderloin creating a central cavity. If the tenderloin is quite long, do it on both sides (step 3 - pic. A).
      Fill the cavity with the flavouring paste using your fingers or a larding knife (step 3 - pic. B).
      With a brush, spread the remaining paste all over the piece of tenderloin and do the same with the diced meat (step 3 - pic. C).

  • 4.
    Searing the meat in hot butter and dusting it with flour

    • The brushed tenderloin and diced meat
    • The saucepan with the melted butter, sage and garlic
    • Plain flour - about 80gr or as needed
    • One plate

      Set the heat under the saucepan to a high power and let the butter get hotter. As soon as it starts sizzling and foaming, put in the meat in and thoroughly seal it on all sides and ends (step 4 - pic. A).
      Then, take the saucepan off the heat and take out the sealed meat.
      Dust the meat with a thin layer of flour (step 4 - pic. B).
      Put the saucepan back on a high heat and sear again the meat thoroughly (step 4 - pic. C).
      When done, take the meat out and set aside. Through away the burned butter with its flavouring herbs and clean the saucepan.

  • 5.
    Seasoning the meat and cooking it in milk cream

    • The sealed meat
    • The remaining black pepper
    • Salt - 5gr
    • Whole milk - 250m
    • Double cream - 1lt
    • Butter - 30gr [part 3 of 3]
    • Anchovies - 20gr [part 2 of 2]
    • Sage sprigs - 1 [part 2 of 2]
    • “Suited garlic” - 2 cloves
    • The clean saucepan with its lid

      Season the meat on all sides with a pinch of salt (step 5 - pic. A).
      Put the saucepan on a low heat and add the butter, the garlic cloves, the sage and the anchovies (step 5 - pic. B). Put in the meat.
      Mix the milk and the double cream together and pour it all into the saucepan, so the meat is almost completely covered in it (step 5 - pic. C).
      Cover the saucepan with its lid and let it cook gently for about 20 minutes, basting the meat if necessary and turning it from time to time.
      Then check the seasoning of the cream, adjusting it with the remaining salt according to your personal taste.
      Loosely cover the saucepan with its lid and let the sauce reduce for another 20minutes (step 5 - pic. D). Then take off the lid and let it cook for another 10 or 15 minutes always on a low heat and turning the meat from side to side.
      Let the sauce reduce almost by the half, but do not cook the meat any longer, or it will get tough and dry despite the cream and the butter in which it has been cooked.

  • 6.
    Filtering the sauce, chilling and cutting the meat

    • The saucepan with the meat and cream
    • One thin metal sieve
    • One bowl
    • One wooden or silicone spatula
    • One chopping board
    • One chef knife
    • Tinfoil (optional)

      Take the saucepan off the heat, take out the meat and set it aside. Wrap it in tinfoil and let it chill completely, but even if you are going to serve the pork in a short while, this will anyway allow to keep the juices inside the meat.
      Filter the sauce through a thin sieve and set aside (step 6 - pic. A-B).
      Clean the saucepan and put the sauce and the unwrapped meat back in.
      Before serving, reheat the sauce first and then add the meat to warm it up. Do not overheat, or it will get dry and tough. Also, a bain-marie might do a better job (step 6 - pic. C).

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Pork tenderloin in milk cream with pan-fried fennels
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