“Rigatoni with Artichokes and Taggiasche Olives” recipe

    • Prep Time
    • Minutes
    • Cook Time
    • Minutes

Rigatoni with artichokes and taggiasche olives

Total Cost: UK/£ 8,13*

Cost/portion: UK/£ 2,02*

Taggiasche Olives: a Ligurian culinary delight

Taggiasche olives are a small and extremely tasty cultivar of olives that come from Liguria. The cultivar has been brought to Taggia, close to Imperia, by the monks of St. Columbanus and although it did spread almost all over the country, it is still considered typical of that area.

In spite of its tiny dimensions, this olive is considered one of the most important culinary delights of Italy and its oil is golden and dense, with a very distinctive fruity note that make it excellent both for cooking and for cold preparations, such as pesto, or salad condiment: it will never overtake the flavour of the main ingredient.

Here you can find the link to the official website of Oliva Taggiasca, which is in english and can describe this little marvel much better than me.

Note for the users: please click on the label “HOW TO” to watch the slide-show of each cooking step.

* Please note that both total cost and cost per portion are approximate and that can vary according to seasons and to different conditions.

Recipe Rating

  • (1 Rating)

Ingredients

  • for the sauce

  • Globe artichokes - 650gr (2 large)

  • Extra Virgin Olive Oil - 40gr

  • "Suited garlic”cloves - 3

  • Parsley sprigs - 20gr [part 1of 2]

  • Parsley sprigs - 3 or 4 [part 2 of 2]

  • Thyme sprigs - 4 or 5

  • Mint sprigs - 2 or 3

  • Taggiasche Olives (pitted)* - 60gr

  • *in alternative, you can use either green or black olives, provided that they are plain.
  • Black pepper - 3gr

  • Salt - to taste

  • for the pasta

  • Rigatoni - 320gr

  • Fresh water - 5lt

  • Salt - 35gr

  • Utensils for the sauce

  • One kitchen towel

  • Cooking String

  • One large bowl

  • One paring knife or a shaping knife

  • One mellon baller

  • One sharp chef knife

  • One chopping board

  • One frying pan

  • One pestle and mortar

  • Utensils for the pasta

  • One 6-8lt saucepan

  • One ladle

  • One large strainer or a pasta server

  • Two wooden spoons or silicon spatulas (if necessary)

Instructions

  • 1.
    Boiling the water, preparing the frying base for the sauce

    • Black pepper - 3gr
    • “Suited Garlic - 3
    • Parsley sprigs - 20gr [part 1 of 2]
    • Thyme sprigs - 4 or 5
    • Mint sprigs - 2 or 3
    • Extra Virgin Olive Oil - 40gr
    • One kitchen towel
    • Cooking String
    • One pestle and mortar
    • One frying pan
    • Water - 5lt
    • One 6-8lt saucepan

      Put the saucepan with 5lt of water over a high heat.
      Thoroughly wash both the thyme, the mint and the parsley, then lay it on a kitchen towel. Separate the parsley stalks from the leaves and dry both gently. Tie up the stalks with some cooking strings and set aside.
      Finely crush the black pepper corns and set aside.
      Put the frying pan on a low heat with the 40gr of extra virgin olive oil, the “Suited Garlic” cloves, the thyme and the parley stalks (step 1 - pic.).

    Note about salt and water for pasta

    If you think you might forget to salt water before adding pasta, you can salt water right after putting it on heat. This can become a safe routine, but the commonly unknown result of this is that it will require a longer time to come to the boiling temperature of 100ºC. It would be better instead to wait for the boiling to start and then carefully add the salt. The addiction of salt at this stage causes a sudden increase of the temperature of the solution for a couple of seconds during which the water increases the bubbling and risks to pour out if the pan’s sides are not sufficiently high.

    So the right pan should be taller than its diameter and capacious enough to contain a good amount of water.

    The minimum ratio between water and pasta is 1lt every 100gr. Although, for small amount of pasta it’s better to use a fairly large and deep pan which will keep the water to temperature also after dropping the pasta in. So that’s why I prefer to use 5lt of water even just to cook a single portion of pasta.

    Another important detail of which to take care, is the right quantity of salt to add to the water. It depends on the quantity of salt the condiment for pasta is going to contain and the cooking time that pasta requires; not only on your personal taste.

    A normal dose of salt is 11-12gr per litre of water and it can be increased to a maximum of 14-15gr for those who like their food to be particularly savoury. When using ingredients which are already salty themselves, like bacon or ham, the dose can be lowered to a minimum of 9-10gr per litre of water, as well as when you know that you will bind pasta with a lot of its own cooking water.

    Keep also in mind that longer cooking time require smaller doses of salt whereas quicker cooking will need a larger dose.

  • 2.
    Cleaning the artichokes and boiling the water for pasta

    • Parsley sprigs - 3 or 4 [part 2of 2]
    • Globe artichokes - 650gr (2 large)
    • The Saucepan with the boiling water for pasta
    • Cooking String
    • One large bowl
    • One paring knife or a shaping knife
    • One mellon baller
    • One sharp chef knife
    • One chopping board

      Fill the bowl with cold water and break a few parley sprigs directly into it: just like lemon juice, it will prevent the artichokes to blacken.
      Cut off the stalks and peel them. Tie them up with some cooking string (step 2 - pic. A).
      Drop the stalks into the boiling water (step 2 - pic. B).
      Tear off the hard external leaves of the artichoke until you expose the thinner and more tender ones. With the paring knife or the shaping knife, clean the base of the artichoke’s heart running the blade around it, almost like if you were peeling an apple.
      With the chef knife, cut the artichoke’s top, about at 3 quarters of its length.
      Halve the artichokes and thoroughly clean the hairy core using a melon baller or a paring knife. Put the clean artichokes into the bowl while you keep working on the others (step 2 - pic. C).

  • 3.
    Slicing the artichokes and cooking the sauce with olives

    • The cleaned artichokes
    • The base in the frying pan
    • Salt - to taste
    • Taggiasche Olives (pitted)* - 60gr
      *in alternative, you can use either green or black olives, provided that they are plain.

    • One chopping board
    • One chef knife
    • One ladle

      Set the heat to the a medium power under the frying pan. Finely slice the artichokes into a julienne and add them immediately to the frying base. Stir and let them soften for about 3 or 4 minutes (step 3 - pic. A).
      Add one ladle of hot boiling water from the saucepan and increase the heat under the frying pan. Then let it reduce almost completely.
      Check if the artichokes are cooked through, if not, add another ladle of boiling water (step 3 - pic. b).
      Just before dropping the rigatoni into the water, finely chop the mint together with the parsley leaves and set aside. Then add the Taggiasche olives to the cooked artichokes and stir evenly. Lower the heat to aminimum under the frying pan (step 3 - pic. c).

  • 4.
    Boiling the rigatoni

    • The boiling water in the saucepan with the artichoke stalks
    • Salt - 35gr
    • Rigatoni - 320gr
    • The crushed black pepper
    • The artichokes and lives sauce

      As soon as the water comes to a stable boiling, add the salt, let it settle for a few seconds and add the rigatoni. Stir evenly for a the first few minutes to prevent the sticking to each other (step 4 - pic. A).
      Check the seasoning of the sauce, correct it if necessary and add the crushed black pepper (step 4 - pic. B).

  • 5.
    Straining the rigatoni

    • The frying pan with the artichoke and olives sauce
    • One ladle
    • One large strainer or a pasta server

      Check the cooking time instructions on the pasta bag and remember that you will need to take the rigatoni out of the water just one minute earlier. Strain them when perfectly “al dente”.
      Collect about 20ml or 25ml of cooking water with a ladle and put aside in a small receptacle.
      Drain the pasta thoroughly with a strainer but do not let it dry completely. As an alternative, you can use a pasta server and move the pasta directly from the saucepan to the frying pan.

      Note about the correct cooking point "al dente”

      “Al dente” literally means “to the tooth”. It indicates the perfect consistency that pasta, or any other food, should have at the end of the cooking process: not too soft and not too hard at chewing. Pasta cooked “al dente” maintains a harder consistency at the centre of the dough sheet which gives the diners a pleasant feeling of “biting” rather than “mushing” something under their teeth..

  • 6.
    Binding the rigatoni with the sauce

    • The sauce in the frying pan
    • The chopped parley
    • Cooking liquor - as needed
    • One ladle
    • Two wooden spoons or silicon spatulas (if necessary)

      Add the rigatoni to the cooking sauce, set the heat to a high power and mix them together. Add one ladle of cooking liquor and let it reduce completely. If the pasta needs to cook a little longer, add more liquor a bit at a time and allow it thickening: it will create a liquor that will coat the pasta(step 6 - pic. A).
      Just before serving, spread the chopped parsley on top and stir evenly (step 6 - pic. B).

  • Instructions

    • 1.
      Boiling the water, preparing the frying base for the sauce

      • Black pepper - 3gr
      • “Suited Garlic - 3
      • Parsley sprigs - 20gr [part 1 of 2]
      • Thyme sprigs - 4 or 5
      • Mint sprigs - 2 or 3
      • Extra Virgin Olive Oil - 40gr
      • One kitchen towel
      • Cooking String
      • One pestle and mortar
      • One frying pan
      • Water - 5lt
      • One 6-8lt saucepan

        Put the saucepan with 5lt of water over a high heat.
        Thoroughly wash both the thyme, the mint and the parsley, then lay it on a kitchen towel. Separate the parsley stalks from the leaves and dry both gently. Tie up the stalks with some cooking strings and set aside.
        Finely crush the black pepper corns and set aside.
        Put the frying pan on a low heat with the 40gr of extra virgin olive oil, the “Suited Garlic” cloves, the thyme and the parley stalks (step 1 - pic.).

      Note about salt and water for pasta

      If you think you might forget to salt water before adding pasta, you can salt water right after putting it on heat. This can become a safe routine, but the commonly unknown result of this is that it will require a longer time to come to the boiling temperature of 100ºC. It would be better instead to wait for the boiling to start and then carefully add the salt. The addiction of salt at this stage causes a sudden increase of the temperature of the solution for a couple of seconds during which the water increases the bubbling and risks to pour out if the pan’s sides are not sufficiently high.

      So the right pan should be taller than its diameter and capacious enough to contain a good amount of water.

      The minimum ratio between water and pasta is 1lt every 100gr. Although, for small amount of pasta it’s better to use a fairly large and deep pan which will keep the water to temperature also after dropping the pasta in. So that’s why I prefer to use 5lt of water even just to cook a single portion of pasta.

      Another important detail of which to take care, is the right quantity of salt to add to the water. It depends on the quantity of salt the condiment for pasta is going to contain and the cooking time that pasta requires; not only on your personal taste.

      A normal dose of salt is 11-12gr per litre of water and it can be increased to a maximum of 14-15gr for those who like their food to be particularly savoury. When using ingredients which are already salty themselves, like bacon or ham, the dose can be lowered to a minimum of 9-10gr per litre of water, as well as when you know that you will bind pasta with a lot of its own cooking water.

      Keep also in mind that longer cooking time require smaller doses of salt whereas quicker cooking will need a larger dose.

  • 2.
    Cleaning the artichokes and boiling the water for pasta

    • Parsley sprigs - 3 or 4 [part 2of 2]
    • Globe artichokes - 650gr (2 large)
    • The Saucepan with the boiling water for pasta
    • Cooking String
    • One large bowl
    • One paring knife or a shaping knife
    • One mellon baller
    • One sharp chef knife
    • One chopping board

      Fill the bowl with cold water and break a few parley sprigs directly into it: just like lemon juice, it will prevent the artichokes to blacken.
      Cut off the stalks and peel them. Tie them up with some cooking string (step 2 - pic. A).
      Drop the stalks into the boiling water (step 2 - pic. B).
      Tear off the hard external leaves of the artichoke until you expose the thinner and more tender ones. With the paring knife or the shaping knife, clean the base of the artichoke’s heart running the blade around it, almost like if you were peeling an apple.
      With the chef knife, cut the artichoke’s top, about at 3 quarters of its length.
      Halve the artichokes and thoroughly clean the hairy core using a melon baller or a paring knife. Put the clean artichokes into the bowl while you keep working on the others (step 2 - pic. C).

  • 3.
    Slicing the artichokes and cooking the sauce with olives

    • The cleaned artichokes
    • The base in the frying pan
    • Salt - to taste
    • Taggiasche Olives (pitted)* - 60gr
      *in alternative, you can use either green or black olives, provided that they are plain.

    • One chopping board
    • One chef knife
    • One ladle

      Set the heat to the a medium power under the frying pan. Finely slice the artichokes into a julienne and add them immediately to the frying base. Stir and let them soften for about 3 or 4 minutes (step 3 - pic. A).
      Add one ladle of hot boiling water from the saucepan and increase the heat under the frying pan. Then let it reduce almost completely.
      Check if the artichokes are cooked through, if not, add another ladle of boiling water (step 3 - pic. b).
      Just before dropping the rigatoni into the water, finely chop the mint together with the parsley leaves and set aside. Then add the Taggiasche olives to the cooked artichokes and stir evenly. Lower the heat to aminimum under the frying pan (step 3 - pic. c).

  • 4.
    Boiling the rigatoni

    • The boiling water in the saucepan with the artichoke stalks
    • Salt - 35gr
    • Rigatoni - 320gr
    • The crushed black pepper
    • The artichokes and lives sauce

      As soon as the water comes to a stable boiling, add the salt, let it settle for a few seconds and add the rigatoni. Stir evenly for a the first few minutes to prevent the sticking to each other (step 4 - pic. A).
      Check the seasoning of the sauce, correct it if necessary and add the crushed black pepper (step 4 - pic. B).

  • 5.
    Straining the rigatoni

    • The frying pan with the artichoke and olives sauce
    • One ladle
    • One large strainer or a pasta server

      Check the cooking time instructions on the pasta bag and remember that you will need to take the rigatoni out of the water just one minute earlier. Strain them when perfectly “al dente”.
      Collect about 20ml or 25ml of cooking water with a ladle and put aside in a small receptacle.
      Drain the pasta thoroughly with a strainer but do not let it dry completely. As an alternative, you can use a pasta server and move the pasta directly from the saucepan to the frying pan.

      Note about the correct cooking point "al dente”

      “Al dente” literally means “to the tooth”. It indicates the perfect consistency that pasta, or any other food, should have at the end of the cooking process: not too soft and not too hard at chewing. Pasta cooked “al dente” maintains a harder consistency at the centre of the dough sheet which gives the diners a pleasant feeling of “biting” rather than “mushing” something under their teeth..

  • 6.
    Binding the rigatoni with the sauce

    • The sauce in the frying pan
    • The chopped parley
    • Cooking liquor - as needed
    • One ladle
    • Two wooden spoons or silicon spatulas (if necessary)

      Add the rigatoni to the cooking sauce, set the heat to a high power and mix them together. Add one ladle of cooking liquor and let it reduce completely. If the pasta needs to cook a little longer, add more liquor a bit at a time and allow it thickening: it will create a liquor that will coat the pasta(step 6 - pic. A).
      Just before serving, spread the chopped parsley on top and stir evenly (step 6 - pic. B).

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