Risotto with Bladder Campion
Risotto allo Sclopit

    • Prep Time
    • Minutes
    • Cook Time
    • Minutes
    • Difficulty Level

Risotto with Bladder Campion - The ingredients

Total Cost: UK/£ 4,40*

Cost/portion: UK/£ 1,10*

This is one of the first dishes I have a memory of… Grandma G. used to go foraging very often: it was a quite common thing for people living in the countryside or in the outskirts of small towns like ours. Bladder Campion, “scoplit” we called it in our local dialect, is still quite a common herb to find, and if you were lucky, you would get home with your wicker basket full of it…

“Tomorrow, risotto with Sclopit!” she used to say… and you knew you would be cleaning it leaf by leaf for hours while watching the evening show on TV.

The recipe si very simple and easy to make, and Bladder Campion has a delicate, sweet and grassy flavour. Originally, it didn’t have garlic in it, but I think that it goes perfectly well together with it.

If you are interested in foraging yourself, you might be interested in reading how to store Bladder Campion here.

 

Note for the users: please click on the label “HOW TO” to watch the slide-show of each cooking step.

* Please note that both total cost and cost per portion are approximate and that can vary according to seasons and to different conditions.

Recipe Rating

  • (1 Rating)

Ingredients

  • Rice (carnaroli)*- 320gr

  • you can also use other types of rice like arborio or vialone nano
  • Vegetable stock** - 1,8lt (see recipe here)

  • **in alternative, 1,8lt of boiling water and one and a half or two stock cubes or gel portions. Melt the cubes or gels in boiling water and sieve before use to clean it from undesired pieces of vegetables. Also reduce the amount of salt that follows.
  • Salt - 9gr

  • Black pepper corns - 2gr

  • Sweet Onion - 120gr

  • "Suited garlic”cloves - 2

  • Parmigiano cheese - 70gr

  • Butter - 40gr [part 1 of 2]

  • Dry White Wine - 20ml [part 1 of 2]

  • Bladder campion - 85gr (or 130gr if already bleached and defrosted)

  • Salt - 2 pinches or to taste

  • Dry White Wine - 60ml [part 2 of 2]

  • Butter - 35gr [part 2 of 2]

  • Utensils

  • One pestle and mortar

  • One paring knife

  • One sharp chef knife

  • One chopping board

  • One small saucepan 2-3lt

  • One frying pan

  • One 4-5lt saucepan

  • One zester or grater

  • One food processor

  • One medium frying pan

  • One ladle

  • One big wooden spoon or silicone spatula

  • Sterilising fluid for food - (use according to instructions)

Instructions

  • 1.
    Putting the stock to boil and washing the fresh bladder campion

    • Vegetable stock* - 1,8lt (see recipe here)
    • *in alternative, 1,8lt of boiling water and one and a half or two stock cubes or gel portions. Melt the cubes or gels in boiling water and sieve before use to clean it from undesired pieces of vegetables. Also reduce the amount of salt that follows.

    • Salt **- 9gr
    • **reduce to taste if you are using stock cubes or gel portions.

    • Salt - 9gr
    • Bladder Campion - 85gr (fresh and clean from any dirt)
    • One small saucepan 2-3lt
    • Sterilising fluid for food - (use according to instructions)

      Put the vegetable stock to boil and add the 9gr of salt.
      Clean the sink, fill it with fresh clean water and add the sterilising fluid according to its instructions.
      Bathe the leaves in the sink’s water. Let them rest for about 15 minutes or as long as the instructions say to be enough. Move them gently from time to time, so the dirt will fall on the bottom.
      Then, move the bladder campion into a large bowl, drain the dirty water, clean the sink and put the bladder campion back in. Fill the sink again with fresh water and rinse the leaves one last time.

  • 2.
    Preparing the garlic and onion base

    • Butter - 40gr [part 1 of 2]
    • “Suited garlic” cloves - 2
    • Sweet Onion - 120gr Parmigiano cheese - 70gr
    • Dry White Wine - 20ml [part 1 of 2]
    • One paring knife
    • One sharp chef knife
    • One chopping board
    • One 4-5lt saucepan
    • One zester or grater

      Put the saucepan on a low heat with the butter and the garlic cloves. Let the butter melt slowly and gain flavour (step 2 - pic. A).
      Meanwhile, cut off the onion’s top end and clean its routes. Cut in half longwise and take off its tunics, then cut it into a fine brunoise.
      When the butter starts foaming, add the onions, stir evenly and let them fry slowly for 4 to 5 minutes on a low heat (step 2 - pic. B).
      Grate the cheese with a zester or a fine grater and set it aside.
      When onions have soften completely and have turned golden, add the 20ml of dry white wine and let it reduce completely (step 2 - pic. C).

      Note about cutting the onion into brunoise

      With a paring knife, chop off the tip of the onion. Clean the roots, halve it and peel off the tunics. Put each half facing down on a chopping board. With either the paring knife or the tip of the chef knife, make vertical cuts - 2millimeters apart from each other - driving the tip of the knife as close to the roots as possible. Hold the onion together with one hand’s fingers, get the chef knife and with a fulcrum movement complete the mincing with narrow cuts.

  • 3.
    Cooking and processing the bladder campion

    • The fried base of garlic and onion
    • The clean bladder campion - 85gr (or 130gr if already bleached and defrosted)
    • Salt - 2 pinches or to taste
    • Black pepper corns - 2gr
    • One food processor
    • One pestle and mortar

      Add the bladder campion to the frying base, increase the heat slightly and add one ladle of vegetable stock (step 3 - pic. A).
      Season with salt to taste, then let the bladder campion cook for about 8 or 10 minutes (if already bleached it will cook slightly quicker), adding some more stock if needed.
      Meanwhile, crush the black pepper corns into a mortar and set aside.
      When completely soften, take out the garlic cloves and put the bladder campion into a food processor and make a very thin and smooth mixture (step 3 - pic. B). Then, put it back into the saucepan and set the heat on a low power.

  • 4.
    Toasting the rice (dry method) and adding it to the bladder campion base

    • Rice (carnaroli)* - 320gr
    • *you can also use other type of rice like arborio or vialone nano.

    • Dry white wine - 60ml (part 2 of 2)

    • One frying pan
    • One wooden spoon or silicon spatula

      Toasting the rice is absolutely essential for a good and appropriate final result. If its grain would not be going through this process, instead of a risotto, you would be serving a mushy sticky soup. The exposure of each single rice grain to direct heat will seal its pores. During the cooking, the starches will be held back inside the grains which will be maintained whole. This dry method is the more appropriate for this kind of risotto: since the main flavouring ingredient contains a lot of liquid, it would not be able to seal the grains. But rice can also be toasted in a fat with the a frying flavouring base.
      Spread the rice evenly in the frying pan and put it on medium-high heat. Keep stirring and tossing the rice so that all its grains will gradually gain a distinctive pearl-white colour in the centre and slightly translucent edges. When ready, the grains will start resisting the stirring lightly and they will make a tingling noise hitting the pan’s sides (step 4 - pic. A).
      Now, add the wine all at once and stir so it wets the rice evenly (step 4 - pic. B). Keep stirring while the wine reduces, but do not let it dry completely. Since the rice must keep it’s white colour during all this toasting process, consider to reduce the heat under the pan.
      Immediately add the rice to the saucepan with the bladder campion mixture and stir evenly.

  • 5.
    Cooking the rice

    • The processed bladder campion base in the saucepan
    • The boiling stock
    • One wooden or silicone spatula
    • One ladle

      Make sure the stock is boiling intensely and let the rice and bladder campion mixture cook for a minute (20 seconds each 100gr of rice) so the aromas will sink into the rice grains and the wine will evaporate completely (step 5 - pic. A).
      With the heat still set on low power, pour in about three ladles of stock, so this will barely cover the rice.
      Let it gain the boiling again stirring continuously, while the rice grains gradually absorb the liquids (step 5 - pic. B).
      
Keep adding stock ladle by ladle, making the rice absorb it each time (the stock must be kept boiling, otherwise it will drop the temperature of the mixture and block the cooking). Carefully increase the heat gradually.
      
Depending on the type of rice you are using, the cooking will take from 15 to 18 minutes and you will end up with a creamy but steady mixture.
      Check if the rice is cooked: it must be “al dente”. Which means that the grains have to be cooked right to their core, but they still can put up resistance to your chewing. If it tastes still raw and it is too crunchy, carefully add some more stock.
      
Check the seasoning, correct the salt if necessary and stir.

  • 6.
    Binding the risotto

    • The cooked rice
    • The crushed black pepper
    • Butter - 35gr [part 2 of 2]
    • The grated parmigiano cheese
    • One big wooden spoon or silicone spatula

      Get the saucepan off the heat. Let the rice rest for about one minute and a half: ratio should be: one minute every kilo of risotto (step 6 - pic. A).
      Then, add the butter and the black pepper and stir allowing the fat emulsifying with the starchy liquor.
      Use the spoon or the spatula to bring the rice from the outside to the centre in large circular movements, collecting it from the bottom and moving it to the top. Then, add the cheese to the risotto and stir again (step 6 - pic. B).
      The mixture will gain consistency becoming creamy and billowy or “all’onda” as we call it in Italian (step 6 - pic. C). If you think it’s still too thick, gradually add small amounts of stock and stir again.
      Allow it to rest for no more than one minute and then serve it.

Instructions

  • 1.
    Putting the stock to boil and washing the fresh bladder campion

    • Vegetable stock* - 1,8lt (see recipe here)
    • *in alternative, 1,8lt of boiling water and one and a half or two stock cubes or gel portions. Melt the cubes or gels in boiling water and sieve before use to clean it from undesired pieces of vegetables. Also reduce the amount of salt that follows.

    • Salt **- 9gr
    • **reduce to taste if you are using stock cubes or gel portions.

    • Salt - 9gr
    • Bladder Campion - 85gr (fresh and clean from any dirt)
    • One small saucepan 2-3lt
    • Sterilising fluid for food - (use according to instructions)

      Put the vegetable stock to boil and add the 9gr of salt.
      Clean the sink, fill it with fresh clean water and add the sterilising fluid according to its instructions.
      Bathe the leaves in the sink’s water. Let them rest for about 15 minutes or as long as the instructions say to be enough. Move them gently from time to time, so the dirt will fall on the bottom.
      Then, move the bladder campion into a large bowl, drain the dirty water, clean the sink and put the bladder campion back in. Fill the sink again with fresh water and rinse the leaves one last time.

  • 2.
    Preparing the garlic and onion base

    • Butter - 40gr [part 1 of 2]
    • “Suited garlic” cloves - 2
    • Sweet Onion - 120gr Parmigiano cheese - 70gr
    • Dry White Wine - 20ml [part 1 of 2]
    • One paring knife
    • One sharp chef knife
    • One chopping board
    • One 4-5lt saucepan
    • One zester or grater

      Put the saucepan on a low heat with the butter and the garlic cloves. Let the butter melt slowly and gain flavour (step 2 - pic. A).
      Meanwhile, cut off the onion’s top end and clean its routes. Cut in half longwise and take off its tunics, then cut it into a fine brunoise.
      When the butter starts foaming, add the onions, stir evenly and let them fry slowly for 4 to 5 minutes on a low heat (step 2 - pic. B).
      Grate the cheese with a zester or a fine grater and set it aside.
      When onions have soften completely and have turned golden, add the 20ml of dry white wine and let it reduce completely (step 2 - pic. C).

      Note about cutting the onion into brunoise

      With a paring knife, chop off the tip of the onion. Clean the roots, halve it and peel off the tunics. Put each half facing down on a chopping board. With either the paring knife or the tip of the chef knife, make vertical cuts - 2millimeters apart from each other - driving the tip of the knife as close to the roots as possible. Hold the onion together with one hand’s fingers, get the chef knife and with a fulcrum movement complete the mincing with narrow cuts.

  • 3.
    Cooking and processing the bladder campion

    • The fried base of garlic and onion
    • The clean bladder campion - 85gr (or 130gr if already bleached and defrosted)
    • Salt - 2 pinches or to taste
    • Black pepper corns - 2gr
    • One food processor
    • One pestle and mortar

      Add the bladder campion to the frying base, increase the heat slightly and add one ladle of vegetable stock (step 3 - pic. A).
      Season with salt to taste, then let the bladder campion cook for about 8 or 10 minutes (if already bleached it will cook slightly quicker), adding some more stock if needed.
      Meanwhile, crush the black pepper corns into a mortar and set aside.
      When completely soften, take out the garlic cloves and put the bladder campion into a food processor and make a very thin and smooth mixture (step 3 - pic. B). Then, put it back into the saucepan and set the heat on a low power.

  • 4.
    Toasting the rice (dry method) and adding it to the bladder campion base

    • Rice (carnaroli)* - 320gr
    • *you can also use other type of rice like arborio or vialone nano.

    • Dry white wine - 60ml (part 2 of 2)

    • One frying pan
    • One wooden spoon or silicon spatula

      Toasting the rice is absolutely essential for a good and appropriate final result. If its grain would not be going through this process, instead of a risotto, you would be serving a mushy sticky soup. The exposure of each single rice grain to direct heat will seal its pores. During the cooking, the starches will be held back inside the grains which will be maintained whole. This dry method is the more appropriate for this kind of risotto: since the main flavouring ingredient contains a lot of liquid, it would not be able to seal the grains. But rice can also be toasted in a fat with the a frying flavouring base.
      Spread the rice evenly in the frying pan and put it on medium-high heat. Keep stirring and tossing the rice so that all its grains will gradually gain a distinctive pearl-white colour in the centre and slightly translucent edges. When ready, the grains will start resisting the stirring lightly and they will make a tingling noise hitting the pan’s sides (step 4 - pic. A).
      Now, add the wine all at once and stir so it wets the rice evenly (step 4 - pic. B). Keep stirring while the wine reduces, but do not let it dry completely. Since the rice must keep it’s white colour during all this toasting process, consider to reduce the heat under the pan.
      Immediately add the rice to the saucepan with the bladder campion mixture and stir evenly.

  • 5.
    Cooking the rice

    • The processed bladder campion base in the saucepan
    • The boiling stock
    • One wooden or silicone spatula
    • One ladle

      Make sure the stock is boiling intensely and let the rice and bladder campion mixture cook for a minute (20 seconds each 100gr of rice) so the aromas will sink into the rice grains and the wine will evaporate completely (step 5 - pic. A).
      With the heat still set on low power, pour in about three ladles of stock, so this will barely cover the rice.
      Let it gain the boiling again stirring continuously, while the rice grains gradually absorb the liquids (step 5 - pic. B).
      
Keep adding stock ladle by ladle, making the rice absorb it each time (the stock must be kept boiling, otherwise it will drop the temperature of the mixture and block the cooking). Carefully increase the heat gradually.
      
Depending on the type of rice you are using, the cooking will take from 15 to 18 minutes and you will end up with a creamy but steady mixture.
      Check if the rice is cooked: it must be “al dente”. Which means that the grains have to be cooked right to their core, but they still can put up resistance to your chewing. If it tastes still raw and it is too crunchy, carefully add some more stock.
      
Check the seasoning, correct the salt if necessary and stir.

  • 6.
    Binding the risotto

    • The cooked rice
    • The crushed black pepper
    • Butter - 35gr [part 2 of 2]
    • The grated parmigiano cheese
    • One big wooden spoon or silicone spatula

      Get the saucepan off the heat. Let the rice rest for about one minute and a half: ratio should be: one minute every kilo of risotto (step 6 - pic. A).
      Then, add the butter and the black pepper and stir allowing the fat emulsifying with the starchy liquor.
      Use the spoon or the spatula to bring the rice from the outside to the centre in large circular movements, collecting it from the bottom and moving it to the top. Then, add the cheese to the risotto and stir again (step 6 - pic. B).
      The mixture will gain consistency becoming creamy and billowy or “all’onda” as we call it in Italian (step 6 - pic. C). If you think it’s still too thick, gradually add small amounts of stock and stir again.
      Allow it to rest for no more than one minute and then serve it.

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